Ibsen and Early Modernist Theatre, 1890-1900

By Kirsten Shepherd-Barr | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
Philip E. Lewis, "The Measure of Translation Effects", in Difference in Translation, ed. Joseph F. Graham ( Ithaca and London, 1985), p. 36.
2.
abel: The Cultural and Linguistic Barriers between Nations, ed. Rainer Kölmel and Jerry Payne ( Aberdeen, 1989), p. 2.
3.
Speech at the Banquet of the Swedish Society of Authors in Stockholm (13 April 1898), in Sprinchorn, p. 336. Ibsen's views on translation should be seen in relation to his pan-European outlook. For example, he believed that translation had the potential to influence the moral condition of cultures: 'I have a feeling that [Byron's] works translated into our language would be of great assistance in freeing our aesthetics from many moral prejudices--which would be a great gain.' Sprinchorn, p. 118: 'What will not pass muster when tried by our conventional national standard of morality is at once condemned as not fulfilling the requirements of the aesthetic standard either. But a foreign authority carries weight. It is acknowledged here that German literature required Byron's assistance to enable it to reach its present standpoint; and I maintain that we need him to free us from ours.'
4.
Letter to Frederik Gjertsen ( Dresden, 21 March 1872), in Sprinchorn, p. 117. In this letter Ibsen shows a clear technical understanding of the problems of translating Dante and Goethe into Danish.
5.
Speech at the Banquet of the Swedish Society of Authors (11 April 1898), in Sprinchorn, p. 335.
6.
Jones, Georg Brandes: Selected Letters, pp. 39-40, 43. For example, in 1895 Ibsen wrote to Archer (with whom he corresponded in Norwegian): 'I feel more and more this painful lack in myself that I never learnt to speak English. Now of course it is too late! If I had known the language, I would at once journey over to London'. He goes on to proclaim that his Scottish heritage has left deep traces in him. SV, XVIII, p. 373.
7.
Michael Meyer, Strindberg: A Biography ( London, 1985), pp. 275, 277.
8.
But it is used differently in Norwegian, where it bears the temporal meaning 'now.'
9.
Lord H. F., Nora ( New York and London, 1882).
10.
Meyer rather unfairly dismisses it as 'a slightly (but not much) better' version than Weber's 'unfortunate' one; Henrik Ibsen ( London, 1971), vol. II, p. 306, fn. 2.
11.
So distinct are Swedish and Norwegian that Ibsen's plays were as a matter of course translated and performed in Swedish for the Swedish public; see Ibsen's own complaint about this practice in his letter cited above. While Danish and Norwegian in written form were (and still are) so similar that translation was not necessary, of course one does not know what adaptations may have been made (by actors, managers) when the plays were actually performed in Denmark to render them more Danish.
12.
Lord H. F., Nora ( 1882), pp. xiv-xxiv.
13.
Joan Templeton, "The Doll House Backlash: Criticism, Feminism, and Ibsen", PMLA, civ ( 1989), p. 31. Templeton uses the title A Doll House throughout, citing Rolf Fjelde's argument for that as the proper translation; but Et Dukkehjem actually means 'a doll home,' which arguably suits the content of the play even better. The title ' A Doll's House' seems to have originated with Lord in 1882, and it has usually been used by subsequent translators as the standard title for the play. I have retained the standard English title A Doll's House for reasons of simplicity and accessibility.
14.
The title verso of the revised 1890 edition of Nora advertises 'Other Works by Frances Lord,' including her translation of Ghosts ( 1885): 'Originally published in To-

-54-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ibsen and Early Modernist Theatre, 1890-1900
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 200

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.