Toward a Jewish (M)orality: Speaking of a Postmodern Jewish Ethics

By S. Daniel Breslauer | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Before presenting the book itself, I must face up to my own responsibilities, articulate my indebtedness, and hope that readers who enter into conversation with this book will recognize that they are sharing in a discourse that began before these chapters became a book and will continue after this book has been superseded by other books. I acknowledge the varied incarnations that preceded the framing of the chapters of this book as they now appear. Parts of chapter I appeared in Jewish Book Annual 53 ( 1995); chapter 2 appeared in slightly different form as "Between Derrida and Levinas: Postmodern Jewish Ethics," a paper given at the Association for Jewish Studies Annual Meeting in 1995; chapter 3 originated as the President's Address at the Midwest Jewish Studies Association Annual Meeting in 1995 and later appeared as "The Postmodern Moment in Jewish Ethics: De-signing a Postmodern Jewish Morality," Shofar 14:4, 1-17 (Copyright, Purdue Research Foundation, West Lafayette, IN 47907); chapter 4 includes material from "Being Ethical in a Postmodern Age: Toward a Jewish (m)orality," The Reconstructionist 61:2 ( 1996), 82-19. Chapters 5 and 10 include, in somewhat different contexts, material presented as "Usury and a Post-Modern Jewish Ethics," at the Second International Conference on Mishpat Ivri and Talmudic Research in 1995; chapter 6 expands and transforms a study originally presented as "Into Life: The Legacy of Tradition for a Life of Dialogue," at Martin Buber, His Impact on the Human Sciences: An International Interdisciplinary Conference at San Diego State University in 1991; chapter 7 incorporates parts of my published essay "Discovering God in Western Civilization," Bridges: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Theology, Philosophy History, and Science 3:1/2 (Spring/Summer 1991): 69-89; chapter 8 revises the essay as "Myth, Poetry, and Mysticism," in The Seductiveness of Jewish Myth: Challenge or Response (Reprinted from "Myth, Poetry, and Mysticism," by S. Daniel Breslauer by permission of the State

-vii-

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