Toward a Jewish (M)orality: Speaking of a Postmodern Jewish Ethics

By S. Daniel Breslauer | Go to book overview

Ab(O)ut Face: An
Introduction

FACING UP TO REALITY

Jewish ethical reflection today grows out of a confrontation with three traumatic realities. The Nazi Holocaust, in which six million Jews were slaughtered, inspired many Jewish thinkers to reevaluate their understanding of evil, their expectations of divine support for the good and the right, and their sense of human obligation. The realities of modern nationalism forced these thinkers to face up to the problems inherent in earlier ethical theories. Earlier Jewish moral systems had emphasized universal values, the beneficent effect of good deeds, and the ultimate triumph of divine justice. These ideas now seemed naïve in the light of the radical power for absolute evil that nations such as Nazi Germany were able to exert.

Jewish thinkers also face an equally powerful challenge to traditional views from an apparently opposite fact: the creation of the modern State of Israel. For many Jews the recreation of a Jewish national homeland testifies to radically new possibilities in moral choosing. The positive effect of having this new homeland balances the negative effect of experiencing the Holocaust. This homeland, however, comes as the result of human action, as a prize won by violence and armed conflict, by military rather than devotional tactics. Earlier Jewish moral systems drew on traditional teachings and inculcated a reliance on the divine. The success of the secular State of Israel challenges these principles. That success suggests that moral theory should be tested by pragmatic results.

A contemporary Jewish ethics must face up to the twin realities of the twentieth century. It must enable Jews to make sense of the failure of ethics and morality in the case of the Nazis and of the success of secular pragmatism in the case of the creation of the State of Israel. This book looks to the insights

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Toward a Jewish (M)orality: Speaking of a Postmodern Jewish Ethics
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 172

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.