Ethics: The Heart of Leadership

By Joanne B. Ciulla | Go to book overview

a 'governor, '" which meant treating faculty, union leaders, and other administrators as colleagues, instead of subordinates ( Birnbaum 1992, 127). In general, successful academic leaders respected diversity (appreciating, not deprecating, different values). They respected participants' own goals for the institution (building on them, versus correcting them). They respected individuals' right-claims (placing the needs of people before system requirements). And they respected shared leadership (dispersing power, not just decentralizing it). All clearly Madisonian priorities.

There is a final point. I suspect that most of us work in universities with some Madisonian characteristics, whether top administrators encourage them or not. It is interesting that academic professionals create and seek employment in organizations with such institutionalized checks and balances as self-supporting departments, faculty senates, unions, tenure policies, grievance processes, and committees representing every interest imaginable. If this sort of federalist system is what we choose for ourselves, if we claim academic freedom as our right, why should we prescribe any less freedom for others?


NOTES

This chapter was originally published by Business Ethics Quarterly (Vol. 5, No. 1).

1
Washington's inspirational effect on his compatriots is well illustrated by an incident at the close of the war. As hostilities with Britain diminished, so did cooperation between the states with regard to honoring war debts. American soldiers were owed years of back pay; officers had been promised pensions if they served for the duration; and now state representatives were reluctant to pay the bill, hoping the army would just go home. The army instead grew resentful at the lack of public gratitude for members' sacrifices in the cause of independence. A mass meeting of officers was called to discuss ways of securing their rights. Proposed actions included refusing to lay down arms or disband, marching on Congress, and even forming a military community on unsettled land. Some officers wanted Washington to lead the movement against civil authorities, but he appeared at their meeting and argued for restraint. His audience remained unpersuaded -- until Washington pulled from his pocket a piece of paper, a conciliatory letter from Congress. Flexner ( 1967, 507) describes the scene:

The officers stirred impatiently in their seats, and then suddenly every heart missed a beat. Something was the matter with His Excellency. He seemed unable to read the paper. He paused in bewilderment. He fumbled in his waistcoat pocket. And then he pulled out something that only his intimates had seen him wear. A pair of glasses. With infinite sweetness and melancholy, he explained, "Gentlemen, you will permit me to put on my spectacles, for I have not only grown grey but almost blind in the service of my country."

-140-

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Ethics: The Heart of Leadership
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction xv
  • Part I - The Scope of the Issues 1
  • 1 - Leadership Ethics: Mapping the Territory 3
  • Notes 19
  • 2 - Moral Leadership and Business Ethics 27
  • Notes 43
  • Part II - Leaders and Followers: A Difficult Relationship 47
  • 3 - Ethical Challenges in the Leader-Follower Relationship 49
  • Notes 58
  • References 58
  • 4 - Leadership and the Problem of Bogus Empowerment 63
  • Notes 84
  • 5 - Ethical Leadership, Emotions, and Trust: Beyond "Charisma" 87
  • Notes 105
  • Part III - Puzzles and Perils of Transformational Leadership 109
  • 6 - The Trouble with Transformational Leadership: Toward a Federalist Ethic for Organizations 111
  • Notes 140
  • References 141
  • 7 - James Madison and the Ethics of Transformational Leadership 145
  • Notes 165
  • 8 - The Ethics of Transformational Leadership 169
  • Notes 189
  • Index 193
  • About the Editor and Contributors 197
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