Gender, Power, and Communication in Human Relationships

By Pamela J. Kalbfleisch; Michael J. Cody | Go to book overview

Chapter 1
Power and Communication in the Relationships of Women and Men Otuk.

Pamela J. Kalbfleisch University of Wyoming

Michael J. Cody University of Southern California

Men who run the world today are ". . . a bunch of shallow, bald, middle aged men with character disorders. They don't have the emotional capacity it takes to qualify as human beings. One good thing about these white, male, almost extinct mammals is that they are growing old. We get to watch them die."

-- a 36-year-old female trucking-company executive ( Gates, 1993, p. 49)

I want everything to be just like it was before. -- D-Fens quoted from the movie, Falling Down


WHY THIS BOOK NOW?

We write the introduction to this volume in January 1994 exactly 1 year after the inauguration of Bill (and Hillary) Clinton. The Clintons promised change, changes in leadership, welfare program, health care program, domestic programs and, of course, changes in women's roles. Make him president, Bill said, "and you get two for the price of one.""You do not have to tear a woman down to build a man up," Clinton admonished during his campaign. Now, 1 year into their term in office, we have witnessed some (limited) changes in public power held by women. Of course, critics are plentiful -- changes too slow, changes too fast, or as D-Fens mourns, change should be reversed.

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