The Psychology of Values

By Clive Seligman; James M. Olson et al. | Go to book overview

Preface

The Eighth Ontario Symposium on Personality and Social Psychology was held at the University of Western Ontario, August 18-19, 1993. The topic of the symposium was the psychology of values, and the presentations covered a wide variety of issues in this area. As has become the fortunate custom of Ontario Symposia, the papers generated many interesting discussions among participants, as well as many productive interchanges with the approximately 75 additional audience members (20-25 faculty and 50-55 graduate students) from more than a dozen Canadian universities.

The current volume consists of the expanded and updated versions of papers presented initially at the conference. The span of time between the conference and the publication of the book is the result of the practice of giving the authors an opportunity to revise their chapters based on, among other things, feedback obtained from other participants and audience members at the conference. Also, as has become customary, contributors provided comments on preliminary drafts of other participants' chapters -- an undertaking for which we, as editors, are grateful.

The chapters in this volume are roughly organized in the following categories: conceptualizations of values, value systems, and value-attitude-behavior relations (chapters 1 to 4); methodological issues (chapters 5 and 6); the role of values in specific domains, such as prejudice, commitment, and deservingness (chapters 7 to 9); and the transmission of values through families, media, and culture (chapters 10 to 12).

Specifically, in chapter 1, Schwartz demonstrates how value systems can be treated as integrated motivational types that form predictable relations with various behaviors. In chapter 2, Tetlock, Peterson, and Lerner revise Tetlock's earlier,

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