The Psychology of Values

By Clive Seligman; James M. Olson et al. | Go to book overview

6
Social Values and Consumer Behavior: Research From the List of Values

Lynn R. Kahle University of Oregon


SOCIAL ADAPTATION THEORY

The major goal of this chapter is to provide an overview to the work in which my colleagues and I have engaged over the past decade, in which we have applied the List of Values (LOV) to issues in consumer psychology. I begin with a description of the guiding theory, followed by a discussion of the methodological research and some specific theoretical and practical issues.

The theoretical approach on which our research on values has been based is social adaptation theory, which has been elaborated and extended to values from its origin in attitude research ( Kahle, 1983, 1984a, 1984b; Kahle, Kulka, & Klingel, 1980). Values are the most abstract type of social cognition that people use to store and guide general responses to classes of stimuli. According to social adaptation theory, individuals adapt to various life roles in part through value development and value fulfillment. Value development summarizes previous experience and provides a strategy for dealign with new choices. For example, people who value fun and enjoyment may want a computer to play video games, whereas people who value sense of accomplishment may want a computer to use as a work tool. People who value self-respect may resist any new technology that defies a goal of self-reliance.

Values develop from life experiences. People obtain experiences by interacting with their environments in an attempt to develop optimal interchanges with their environments. As Piagetian theory has so well described, information may be assimilated into existing cognitive structures, such as values, or it may accommodate the existing cognitive structures into the more refined structures that result from additional interaction. Once acquired, information is also organized

-135-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Psychology of Values
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 344

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.