Teaching Secondary English: Readings and Applications

By Daniel Sheridan | Go to book overview

APPENDIX C
Hundred-Year Birthday Papers

Note: Aside from altering students' names and names of places, these papers are unedited.


(A)
DOCTOR WHO DISCOVERED CANCER CURE TURNED 100

Jamaica -- Doctor Jennifer "Jenny" H. Cousteau turned 100 years old yesterday. Her birthday celebration was held in her summer home in Jamaica. Over 1000 guests attended the one-day party.

Jenny Cousteau was born on January 15, 1976 in a small town in North Dakota. She lived primarily in the midwest, living in Montana, South Dakota, and Minnesota. At the age of three she almost drowned, near Pipestone, Minnesota. "I saw a girl jumping off a houseboat. It looked like so much fun. I thought I could do it too. The next thing I remembered was my dad's arms reaching down for me," said the centurtan.

At age 13, Jenny moved to Valley, Minnesota; where she graduated from high school in 1994. She then went on to Harvard Medical School where she earned her degree in medicine. At age 23 she married 47-year-old Pierre Cousteau. They had two twin girls, LaToya and Keila.

Jenny and her family moved to Switzerland in 2029 after Pierre became President of the Swiss Bank. While in Switzerland Jenny received a $2 billion grant to work on the cure for cancer. In 2034, Jenny discovered that cancer could be cured with the help of a rare plant in the African Jungle. It was called Healus All-Of-Us. Also in Africa Jenny found Noah's Ark. "It was in the middle of this mountain cave. African headhunters had been using it as a temple. When they saw us, arrows began to fly. I don't know how we ever made it out of there alive."

Tragedy did strike this intriguing women. One month before receiving the Nobel Peace Prize for her work in medicine, Jenny's husband Pierre died from a Piranha attack while fishing in the Amazon River. "I felt so bad. One moment I saw him ( Pierre) sticking his hand in the river to wash it. The next second I saw him floating. It was so horrifying." Said an emotional Jenny.

Dr. Cousteau recovered but not fully. She kept live Piranhas in her bedroom and never left the mansion until 10 years later.

Then in 2050, Jenny married Mr. Rodgers' grandson. She was divorced two weeks later after she found out that he would sing and throw his shoes up in the air every night before bed. "I got so sick and tired of this singing and playing catch with his shoes and NOT ME." said a blushing Jenny.

-386-

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Teaching Secondary English: Readings and Applications
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • 1 - English Teachers 1
  • 2 - Teaching Literature 42
  • 3 - Teaching Writing 119
  • 4 - Teaching about Language 197
  • Appendix A - Sample Outline Syllabus 220
  • Appendix B - Description of Contemporary English 222
  • 5 - What to Teach 283
  • 6 - Joining the Profession 365
  • Appendix A - Classroom Activities 375
  • Appendix B - Childhood Toy Papers 381
  • Appendix C - Hundred-Year Birthday Papers 386
  • Appendix D - Early Drafts: Changes in School 395
  • Appendix E - Comparison Assignment: Then-Now/There-Here Papers 400
  • Appendix F - Sentence Exercises 408
  • Index 419
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