Phonological Processes in Literacy: A Tribute to Isabelle Y. Liberman

By Isabelle Y. Liberman; Susan A. Brady et al. | Go to book overview

17 Beyond Phonological Processes: Print Exposure and Orthographic Processing

Keith E. Stanovich Ontario Institute for Studies in Education

Richard F. West James Madison University

Anne E. Cunningham University of California, Berkeley

It is appropriate for this particular volume to appear at this time, because Isabelle Liberman will shortly have conferred on her a high scientific honor -- one conferred by the scientific process itself, rather than by formal professional or administrative bodies. It is the honor of having one's conceptual viewpoint become absorbed into the background assumptions of all current theories -- and it is the most profound honor in science.

The evolution of knowledge in the area of reading acquisition is now at a stage that the contributions of Isabelle Liberman can best be seen in this light. She was the builder of the foundational assumptions about the importance of phonological processes that we now take for granted. Many of the contributors to this volume share certain assumptions about reading that were far from established when Isabelle began making her seminal contributions to our understanding of reading acquisition. Indeed, an outsider perusing this volume is perhaps in the best position to see the magnitude of her contribution. To the layperson, our refined disputes about precisely how to fractionate phonological abilities and to trace the causal paths of each component will seem, at best, arcane; whereas the background assumptions that we all share will stand out in bold relief. We must remember this point when communicating current research on phonological processes to educators and parents.

-219-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Phonological Processes in Literacy: A Tribute to Isabelle Y. Liberman
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 266

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.