Dream, Creativity, and Madness in Nineteenth-Century France

By Tony James | Go to book overview

Biographical Notes

ALGLAVE ÉMILE ( 1842-1928), economist, director from 1874 of the 'Bibliothèque scientifique internationale', editor of the RS.

APULEIUS (125-c-1 80)), Roman author of The Golden Ass, a book which includes visionary and dream sequences.

AZAM EUGÈNE ( 1822-99), surgeon who became famous for studies of hypnotism and mental pathology, especially the case of Félida X.

BAILLARGER JULES ( 1809-90), alienist at La Salpêtrière, founder (with Cerise and Longet) of the AMP, and of the Société médico-psychologique ( 1852), winner of the Acad. de Médecine's Prix Civrieux in 1844 with a dissertation on hallucinations.

BAILLY JEAN-SYLVAIN ( 1736-93), astronomer, politician, signatory of the report on animal magnetism produced by the Acad. of Science ( 1784).

BALZAC HONORÉ DE ( 1799-1850), author of the 90 novels, including more than 2,000 characters, which make up La Comédie humaine.

BARANTE PROSPER DE ( 1782-1866), historian, author of Histoire des ducs de Bourgogne et de la Maison de Valois (begun 1824).

BAUDELAIRE CHARLES ( 1821-67), poet, author of Les Fleurs du mal ( 1857).

BERTRAND ALEXANDRE ( 1795-1831), doctor, one of the founders of Le Globe, and one of the first to attempt to study somnambulism scientifically.

BICHAT XAVIER ( 1771-1802), anatomist and physiologist, author of Recherches physiologiques sur la vie et la mort ( 1802); made distinction between animal and organic life.

BINET ALFRED ( 1857-1911), psychologist, author of works on animal magnetism and alterations of personality, but also co-author, with André De Lorde, of plays involving mental pathology.

BIOT JEAN-BAPTISTE ( 1774-1862), scientist, mathematician, and astronomer, who went up with Gay-Lussac in his first balloon flight.

BOEHME JACOB ( 1565-1624), shoemaker and German mystic.

BOILEAU NICOLAS ( 1636-1711), poet who epitomized the classical ideal in his Art poétique ( 1674).

BOISBAUDRANsee LECOQ DE BOISBAUDRAN

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