Social Change and Innovation in the Labour Market: Evidence from the Census SARs on Occupational Segregation and Labour Mobility, Part-Time Work and Student Jobs, Homework and Self-Employment

By Catherine Hakim | Go to book overview

9
The Drug Dealers: A Case Study of Pharmacy, an Integrated Occupation

In this chapter the 1% census SAR is used for a case study of pharmacists. Looking at a particular occupational group allows us to draw together the themes of previous chapters, to provide a more rounded view of one example of an integrated occupation, and to consider the links between themes. Chapters 9 and 10 synthesize the analysis and draw conclusions. The approach here is an empirical synthesis, via a strategic case study, while Chapter 10 focuses on theoretical conclusions and policy implications.

Pharmacists were chosen for our case study for two reasons. First, this is now an integrated occupation, with roughly equal numbers of men and women holding a pharmacy qualification and/or working as pharmacists. Second, and equally important, there has been a shortage of pharmacists throughout the second half of the twentieth century, in particular throughout the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s when equal opportunities legislation created a new climate of opinion on women's employment. At a time when repeated recessions limited job opportunities in some professions and industries, there have always been plenty of jobs for pharmacists, who have been able to choose work arrangements to suit themselves. Pharmacy is not only an integrated occupation, but also one that has been expanding and has escaped the constraints of recession. These characteristics pertain to the USA as well as Britain, with similarities and differences between the two countries.1

Normally, the 2% SAR would be the logical choice for case studies of special groups, due to its larger size. In practice, this chapter has to rely exclusively on the smaller 1% SAR as it is the only one containing the detailed classifications of occupation and of educational qualification subjects that enable us to identify pharmacists. This means that the case study samples are relatively small, with 350 qualified pharmacists identified by their highest qualification, 302 pharmacists identified by the occupation of their current or last job, and 247 people who are pharmacists on both criteria.

____________________
1
The choice of pharmacy as a case study was prompted in part by Crompton's research on this profession in Britain and other European countries, and this chapter draws on her reports ( Crompton and Sanderson, 1990: 65-88; Crompton and Le Feuvre, 1996; see also Crompton and Harris, 1998), and in part by the existence of an equivalent case study of pharmacy in the USA ( Reskin and Roos, 1990: 111-27; see also Sokoloff, 1992: 82-9). In both Britain and the USA pharmacy became an integrated occupation over the two decades 1970-90.

-221-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Social Change and Innovation in the Labour Market: Evidence from the Census SARs on Occupational Segregation and Labour Mobility, Part-Time Work and Student Jobs, Homework and Self-Employment
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 318

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.