Social Change and Innovation in the Labour Market: Evidence from the Census SARs on Occupational Segregation and Labour Mobility, Part-Time Work and Student Jobs, Homework and Self-Employment

By Catherine Hakim | Go to book overview

ANNEX A
Labour Market Data in the 1991 Census 1% and 2% SARs
A good introduction to the labour market data in the SARs is provided by the published census 100% and 10% statistics in the reports on Economic Activity, on Qualified Manpower, and on Workplace and Transport to Work. However, the data contained in the SARs goes beyond these statistics in two ways. First, the Census Microdata Unit (CMU) at Manchester University actively seeks to enhance the value of the datasets by adding extra variables from other sources and by adding new derived variables of interest to academic social scientists. Second, the coding of variables in the SARs is full enough to allow researchers to identify and utilize additional information which is not used at all in the published census reports (such as retrospective employment data) or is used only minimally (such as information on student jobs). The first type of information is described in CMU's documentation for the SARs. The second type of information is by definition 'hidden' within the SAR files and has to be extracted by the researcher's analytical work. Several chapters of this book present analyses of the most important hidden labour market data in the SARs: retrospective employment data; concurrent and previous jobs of students in full-time education who are classified as economically inactive; jobs held by people retired on occupational pensions; and people who genuinely work at home (excluding people who live at work or have live-in jobs, who also coded themselves as homeworkers). This Annex describes this additional labour market data available in the SARs but not reported on or used in the official census publications.
Earnings estimates
The British census has never included any questions on income or earnings. Earnings estimates are the most important information added into the SAR files by CMU. Earnings estimates are taken from the 1991 New Earnings Survey (NES) and refer to average hourly earnings in pence excluding any overtime pay. Instead of assigning each employee the average hourly earnings for their occupation, NES mean earnings data were broken down by age, sex, hours worked, and region, using the following breakpoints:
sex: male, female
age: 16-19, 20-29, 30-49, 50+
hours worked: full-time, part-time
occupation: one of 73 occupation groups in the 1991 SOC
region: London and the South-east, rest of Great Britain.

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