The Ethics and Politics of Humanitarian Intervention

By Stanley Hoffmann; Robert C. Johansen et al. | Go to book overview

6
COMMENTS ON COMMENTS

Stanley Hoffmann

I HAVE NO significant disagreements with Prof. Sterba. As this commentator has indicated, I accept his "friendly amendment." In the Yugoslav tragedy, blame can be spread very widely. Certainly, the various organizations involved -- the European Union, the UN, NATO -- have often acted lamentably and ineffectively. But fundamentally this was the fault of the main powers, without whose initiatives and support those organizations can only display their own muddles. I would simply like to point out that Prof. Sterba's formulation of the Kantian approach (which he himself describes as the "currently" most favored formulation) is the Rawlsian version of it, and that Kant's own was very different, as Rawls recognized. My own is, if I may say so, more Kantian than Rawlsian, insofar as my emphasis is on a moral sense of duty, and not on a consensus.

Much of what Prof. Johansen proposes is wise and worthy of consideration by statesmen and scholars. There are two points over which I want to argue with him. First, while I agree with him that we need to distinguish cases of collective security against aggression from interventions in a country's internal affairs aimed at protecting human rights, and while I am quite willing to call the latter cases of humanitarian intervention, there are instances in which domestic turmoil or domestic policies that do not endanger human rights immediately constitute a threat to regional or world peace -- through the production of flows of refugees or because the internal war threatens to spill over into other countries or because, say, a state's nuclear program threatens the stability and security of the area. These cases may well not call for "humanitarian" intervention as it is defined by Prof. Johansen, but intervention may be justified any-

-97-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Ethics and Politics of Humanitarian Intervention
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 124

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.