Igor Stravinsky: The Man and His Music

By Alexandre Tansman; Therese Bleefield et al. | Go to book overview

Conclusion

HAVING arrived at the end of this work, I am perfectly aware of the extent to which it seems to have been conceived in the form of a eulogy.

As I observed at the beginning, there would be no valid reason to undertake this work if it were not inevitably to lead to such a conclusion. But what is of importance here is that this conclusion is based only upon the concrete elements constituting the real value of a body of works, judged in accordance with its own quality and in function of the artistic aspirations peculiar to the composer and to him alone.

This work, then, has nothing to do with an analysis based upon subjective admiration, or with a necessary affinity of tendency or affiliation of school. On the contrary! I have explained with all possible frankness where the lesson ends and the influence begins--that is to say, the extent to which Stravinsky's luminous example could and should be followed as a discipline and as an artistic attitude enriching every genuine personality and helping it to express itself. I have also remarked to what extent

-275-

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Igor Stravinsky: The Man and His Music
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Translators'' Note v
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • PART I 1
  • Chapter I- General Outlook 3
  • Chapter II- Stravinsky and the Phenomenon of Music 9
  • Chapter III- Discipline and Attitude 39
  • Chapter IV- Creative Cypology and Craftsmanship 69
  • PART II 141
  • Chapter V- Life and Works (1882-1920) 143
  • Chapter VI- Life and Works (1920-1948) 207
  • Conclusion 275
  • Chronological Catalogue of Works 279
  • Index 287
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