America and the Origins of World War II, 1933-1941: New Perspectives in History

By Arnold A. Offner | Go to book overview

I The Old Historical Debate

Even before the Second World War had ended many persons (and governments) had begun to prepare and publish their accounts of how it all began. By the middle of the 1950's American historians, political scientists, politicians, and diplomats had published literally hundreds of works -- historical and documentary accounts, memoirs, diaries -- seeking to answer how and why the United States became involved in a world war in December 1941. The first selection, Wayne S. Cole's article, "American Entry into World War II: A Historiographical Appraisal," surveys the literature written before 1957. Cole's major purpose is to point out the nature and limits of the arguments between the pre- and post-Pearl Harbor "noninterventionists" and "internationalists," and "revisionists" and "court historians." He discusses the political and intellectual climates which shaped the views men held and the positions they took before and after the war, and he shrewdly suggests that as more records become available, and as times change, future writers will ask different questions and reach new conclusions. Cole's survey serves as a convenient bibliographical and intellectual point of departure for the readings which follow and the new problems which they explore.

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
America and the Origins of World War II, 1933-1941: New Perspectives in History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • I - The Old Historical Debate 1
  • II - The Consensus on Appeasement, 1933-1938 25
  • III - Between Peace and War, 1939-1941 77
  • IV - The Nuances of Negotiations, 1941 125
  • V - The Axis and Aggression, 1941 157
  • Suggestions for Further Reading 222
  • List of Persons 227
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 232

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.