Speeches and Documents on the Indian Constitution, 1921-47 - Vol. 2

By A. Appadorai; Maurice L. Gwyer | Go to book overview
2. That Pakistan and Bengal be recognized as the homeland of Muslims and Hindustan as the homeland of Hindus, to which they can migrate respectively, if and when they want to do so.
3. In Hindustan the Muslims are to be recognized as a nation in minority and part of a larger nation inhabiting Pakistan and Bengal.
4. The Muslim minority in Hindustan and non-Muslim minority in Pakistan and Bengal will have (i) representation according to population, and (ii) separate electorates and representations at every stage, together with effective religious, cultural and political safeguards guaranteed by all the three States.

NOTE. Separate representation according to population may be granted to all considerable Minorities in the three States, e.g. Sikhs, non-caste Hindus, etc.

5. An accredited Muslim political organization will be the sole official representative body of the Muslims in Hindustan.

Each of these three independent states, Pakistan, Hindustan and Bengal, will have separate treaties of alliance with the Great Britain and separate Crown Representatives, if any. They will have a joint Court of Arbitration to settle any dispute that may arise between themselves or between them and the Crown.

Hyderabad commands a position which is exclusively its own amongst Indian states. It is even now recognized as an ally by the British Government, and its Ruler addressed by the distinctive title of His Exalted Highness. In truth it is a sovereign state by treaties. Berar and Karnatik [Carnatic] were taken from it by the British for administrative reasons. Now when the British are giving the control of India to its rightful owners, they must return to Hyderabad its territories, and recognize Hyderabad expressly as a sovereign state, at least as sovereign as Nepal. Karnatik will restore a sea coast to Hyderabad and Hyderabad will naturally become the southern wing of Muslim India.


VII. DR B. R. AMBEDKAR'S PROPOSALS TO END CONGRESS-LEAGUE DEADLOCK OVER THE ISSUE OF PAKISTAN, 19401

The question of Pakistan is not an academic question which one may refuse to discuss. It does not belong to that class of questions about which people can agree to differ. It is a question for which solution will have to be found. How? It must be by agreement or by arbitration. If it is to be by agreement, it must be the result of negotiations--of give and take and not of surrender by one side to the other. That is not agreement. It is dictation. Good sense may in the end prevail and parties may come to an agreement. But agreement may turn out to be a very dilatory way. It may take long before good sense prevails. How long one cannot say. The political freedom of India is a most urgent necessity. It cannot be postponed and yet without a solution of the communal problem it cannot be hastened. To make it dependent on agreement is to postpone its solution indefinitely. Another expeditious method must be found. It seems to me that

____________________
1
Dr B. R. Ambedkar, Pakistan or Partition of India ( Thacker and Company Ltd., Bombay, 1940), pp. 412-14.

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