Speeches and Documents on the Indian Constitution, 1921-47 - Vol. 2

By A. Appadorai; Maurice L. Gwyer | Go to book overview

PART V: TOWARDS INDEPENDENCE 1937-47

I. A CONSTITUENT ASSEMBLY FOR INDIA

(1) Statement by Mr C. Rajagopalachari on Constituent Assembly, 15 November 19391

It is taken for granted that what the Congress wants is that the Congress and the League should be represented in the Constituent Assembly. This is a grave misconception. What the Congress has urged is not that either the Congress or the League or both or any other political organization should be represented, but that a duly constituted electorate should send members to the Constituent Assembly, and that these should be charged with the duty and entrusted with the power to frame a final draft so that no party organizations or individuals at large may thereafter raise any objections or propose modifications. If an electorate duly representing all the peoples of India approve of the draft Constitution, no self-constituted representatives can thereafter have the right to make counter-proposals and keep the issue alive. It may be taken for granted that in sending duly elected representatives to the Constituent Assembly the principle of separate electorates for such communities as desire it would be applied.

There is the problem of the method of reaching agreed conclusions. There is particularly the question of how to deal with dissenting Minorities, since it may be taken for granted that absolute unanimity cannot be reached. The Congress wishes to proceed on the basis that a majority decision of the representatives of any particular community should be taken as the considered view of that community. As for relative evaluation, Mahatmaji has already stated clearly that the Congress stands for the position that safeguards for the protection of the legitimate interests of Minorities should be such as would be satisfactory to the particular minority community. Otherwise we should be landed once again on British coercion.

As regards the States, it is a mistake to imagine that they are on a par with the minority communities. The States are today Governments, not peoples, for the Governments are unrelated to the people of those States. They should be dealt with on no better footing than as unrepresentative Provincial Governments. They cannot claim the status of Minorities and demand an agreement basis. They should be taken as represented by what is called the Paramount Power which is protecting them and which is the same as the British Government. The latter may bargain for them. Reason should be the deciding factor as regards the requirements of the States and not feelings and apprehensions, nor therefore counting of heads, as in the case of minority communities. If the people of the States take the place of the rulers, the position may be different.

____________________
1
Congress and the War Crisis ( All-India Congress Committee, Allahabad), pp. 144-6.

-475-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Speeches and Documents on the Indian Constitution, 1921-47 - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 804

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.