America and the Origins of World War II, 1933-1941: New Perspectives in History

By Arnold A. Offner | Go to book overview

Suggestions for Further Reading

The literature on the United States and the origins of the Second World War continues to grow as new records (especially those of the British and French governments) become available and as perspectives change and historians search out new problems. Literature published prior to 1957 has been succinctly reviewed in the first selection in this volume by Wayne S. Cole. The Franklin D. Roosevelt Library has published a valuable annotated compendium, The Era of Franklin D. Roosevelt: A Selected Bibliography of Periodical and Dissertation Literature, 1945-1966 ( Hyde Park, N.Y., 1967). The bibliography that follows includes some of the more important works on American, and related European and Far Eastern, foreign policy that have appeared between 1957 and 1969. (Works appearing in whole or in part in this volume are not listed below.)

General or survey works include Selig Adler, The Uncertain Giant, 1921-1941: American Foreign Policy Between the Wars ( New York, 1965), Robert A. Divine, The Reluctant Belligerent: American Entry into World War II ( New York, 1965), Jean-Baptiste Duroselle, From Wilson to Roosevelt: Foreign Policy of the United States, 1913-1945 ( Cambridge, Mass., 1963), Denna F. Fleming, The Cold War and Its Origins, 1917-1960, 2 vols. ( London, 1961), André Fontaine, A History of the Cold War: From the October Revolution to the Korean War, 1917-1960, trans. D. D. Paige ( London, 1968), James J. Martin, American Liberalism and World Politics, 1931-1941, 2 vols. ( New York, 1964), William A. Williams, The Tragedy of American Diplomacy ( Cleveland, 1959), and John E. Wiltz, From Isolation to War, 1931-1941 ( New York, 1968).

The varieties of political and economic attitudes that helped mold American foreign policy are dealt with in Selig Adler, The Isolationist Impulse: Its Twentieth Century Reaction ( New York, 1957), Bernard J. Fensterwald Jr. , "The Anatomy of American 'Isolationism' and Expansionism," Journal of Conflict Resolution, II ( June & Dec. 1958), Lloyd G. Gardner, Economic Aspects of New Deal Diplomacy ( Madison, Wis., 1964), and Manfred Jonas, Isolationism in America, 1935-1941 ( Ithaca, N.Y., 1966), and "Pro-Axis Sentiment and American Isolationism," The Historian, XXIX ( Feb. 1967). Neutrality and security are discussed in Wayne S. Cole, "Senator Key Pittman and American Neutrality Policies," Mississippi Valley Historical Review, XLVI ( Mar. 1960), and Robert A. Divine , The Illusion of Neutrality ( Chicago, 1962) and "Franklin D."

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America and the Origins of World War II, 1933-1941: New Perspectives in History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • I - The Old Historical Debate 1
  • II - The Consensus on Appeasement, 1933-1938 25
  • III - Between Peace and War, 1939-1941 77
  • IV - The Nuances of Negotiations, 1941 125
  • V - The Axis and Aggression, 1941 157
  • Suggestions for Further Reading 222
  • List of Persons 227
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