Speeches and Documents on the Indian Constitution, 1921-47 - Vol. 2

By A. Appadorai; Maurice L. Gwyer | Go to book overview

VI. THE INDIAN PRINCES AND THE CRIPPS MISSION: RESOLUTION OF THE INDIAN STATES DELEGATION1
The Indian States delegation unanimously adopted the following resolution in respect of the proposals of His Majesty's Government which you discussed with them:'The attitude of the Indian States in general on the Mission of the Lord Privy Seal is summed up in the resolution on the subject which was adopted unanimously at the recent session of the Chamber of Princes. The Indian States will be glad as always, in the interest of the motherland, to make their contribution, in every reasonable manner compatible with the sovereignty and integrity of the States, towards the framing of a new constitution for India.'The States should be assured, however, that in the event of a number of States not finding it feasible to adhere, the non-adhering States or group of States so desiring should have the right to form a union of their own, with full sovereign status in accordance with a suitable and agreed procedure devised for the purpose.'The following is the text of the Resolution referred to:
a. That this Chamber welcomes the announcement made in the House of Commons on March 11th, 1942,2 by the Prime Minister and the forthcoming visit to India of the Lord Privy Seal and leader of the House of Commons, and expresses the hope that it may help to unite India to intensify further her war effort and to strengthen the measures for defence of the Motherland.
b. That this Chamber has repeatedly made it clear that any scheme to be acceptable to the States must effectively protect their rights arising from treaties, engagements and sanads or otherwise and ensure the future existence of sovereignty and autonomy of the States thereunder guaranteed, and leave them complete freedom duly to discharge their obligation to the Crown and to their subjects; it therefore notes with particular satisfaction the reference in the announcement of the Prime Minister to the fulfilment of the treaty obligations to the Indian States.
c. That this Chamber authorizes its representatives to carry on the discussions and negotiations for constitutional advance of India with due regard to successful prosecution of war and interests of the States, and subject to the final confirmation by the Chamber and without prejudice to the right of the individual States to be consulted in respect of any proposals affecting their treaty or other inherent rights.

VII. CONSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT IN THE INDIAN STATES

(1) The India (Attachment of States) Act, 1944 (7 & 8 Geo. VI, c. 14) An Act to render legal the attachment of certain Indian States to other Indian States.
1. Attachment of States. (1) At the instance or with the consent of His Majesty's Representative for the exercise of the functions of the
____________________
1
The resolution was communicated to Sir Stafford Cripps by His Highness Digvijayasinliji Maharaja Jam Saheb of Nawanagar, the Chancellor of the Chamber of Princes, in his letter dated 10 April 1942.--Cmd. 6350, pp. 15-16.
2
See p. 519 above. [Ed.]

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