Speeches and Documents on the Indian Constitution, 1921-47 - Vol. 2

By A. Appadorai; Maurice L. Gwyer | Go to book overview
We take it as understood that the arrangements envisaged under this suggestion are intended to proceed on the basis of mutual consent and do not exclude suitable schemes of joint services between some bigger and some smaller States where these may be evolved by mutual agreement. In fact some of the smaller States have admittedly efficient administrations and are willing to do all they can, individually where necessary or through suitable voluntary schemes of joint services, to effect such further improvements as may be possible and required to meet local conditions. The Chamber of Princes has already stated its view that where individual States cannot themselves afford the agreed standards of efficiency required in modern times, they should do so by making suitable arrangements with some other State or States. We are convinced that it is possible to ensure the objective in view without impairing the continuance of the ruling dynasty, the izzat of the Rulers or the integrity and autonomy of the States concerned. The declaration made by the Chancellor during this session makes it clear that the States, big and small, are determined to make every effort possible to raise the standards of living and social services in their States and to associate their peoples with the administration of the States. The Rulers concerned are entitled, however, to be assured that their agreeing to work out suitable schemes of joint services for the further improvement of their administrations will not be used as a justification for undue interference by local officers in their internal affairs. We feel confident that there will be no difficulty in the Rulers concerned themselves agreeing to suitable schemes of joint services where needed, if they are assured in unequivocal terms that such co-operation will not lead to an impairment of their sovereignty and an increase of outside interference. We feel sure that in asking the smaller States which cannot themselves afford to provide the requisite standards of a modern administration to form 'political entities' of sufficient size, Your Excellency has no intention of suggesting any arrangement which may affect the continuance of the ruling dynasties or the integrity or autonomy of the States concerned. We deem it our duty to bring to Your Excellency's notice the serious misgivings which prevail generally amongst the Rulers of so-called smaller States, and we invite Your Excellency's particular sympathy and consideration in approaching the problems of these States.The larger States will, we feel sure, be glad to assist the smaller States to solve their particular problems with success, but any arrangement's in which they are invited to assist must proceed on the initial basis of mutual consent and should involve no impairment of the status of the Rulers or the integrity of the States concerned.
VIII. INDIAN STATES AND THE CABINET MISSION

(1) Memorandum on States' treaties and paramountcy presented by the Cabinet Mission to His Highness the Chancellor of the Chamber of Princes, 12 May 19461
1. Prior to the recent statement of the British Prime Minister in the House of Commons an assurance was given to the Princes that there was no intention on the part of the Crown to initiate any change in their
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1
Cmd. 6835.

-767-

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