Visual Perception and Cognition in Infancy

By Carl Granrud | Go to book overview

Preface

The chapters in this book are based on papers presented at the 23rd Carnegie Mellon Symposia on Cognition, held in Pittsburgh, June, 1990. This symposium was an exciting event. Speaker after speaker presented new discoveries about infants' visual perception in areas ranging from sensory processes to visual cognition. It was apparent from the talks that this field is continuing to make significant progress in understanding the infant's perceptual world.

Several advances have come from the development of new methods for exploring infant perception and cognition that have brought new empirical findings. Outstanding examples of these advances can be seen throughout this volume. Teller and Lindsey describe the "motion-nulling" technique that has allowed them to make precise measurements of infants' chromatic discriminations. Haith presents the innovative method that he has used to investigate infants' expectations about future events. Baillargeon describes the methods she has used to reveal young infants' object permanence. Kellman reviews a number of methods that led to discoveries about infants' object perception abilities; and Arterberry, Craton, and Yonas present new methods that they developed for studying infants' perception of object properties that are specified by motion.

Advances have also been made in understanding the mechanisms underlying perceptual development. Banks and Shannon report findings from "ideal observer" models indicating that immaturities in the retina are a major cause of newborns' poor visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, and chromatic vision. Aslin describes simulations that shed light on the processes involved in the development of accurate saccadic eye movements. Held discusses evidence that de

-vii-

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Visual Perception and Cognition in Infancy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • 1: Spatial and Chromatic Visual Efficiency in Human Neonates 1
  • References 43
  • Acknowledgments 46
  • Acknowledgments 46
  • 2: Motion Nulling Techniques and Infant Color Vision 47
  • Acknowledgments 73
  • References 73
  • 3: What Can Rates of Development Tell Us About Underlying Mechanisms? 75
  • Acknowledgments 89
  • References 89
  • 4: Perception of Visual Direction in Human Infants 91
  • Acknowledgments 119
  • References 119
  • 5: Kinematic Foundations of Infant Visual Perception 121
  • 5: Kinematic Foundations of Infant Visual Perception 168
  • References 173
  • References 173
  • 6: Infants' Perception of Biomechanical Motions: Intrinsic Image and Knowledge-Based Constraints 175
  • Acknowledgments 214
  • References 214
  • 7: Infants' Sensitivity to Motion-Carried Information for Depth and Object Properties 215
  • Acknowledgments 234
  • References 234
  • 8: Future-Oriented Processes in Infancy: The Case of Visual Expectations 235
  • References 263
  • Conclusion 308
  • Acknowledgments 311
  • References 312
  • 10: Commentary: Extending the IdealObserver Approach 317
  • Acknowledgments 331
  • References 331
  • 11: Commentary: Cheers and Lamentations 333
  • References 344
  • Author Index 345
  • Subject Index 353
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