Visual Perception and Cognition in Infancy

By Carl Granrud | Go to book overview

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Visual Perception and Cognition in Infancy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • 1: Spatial and Chromatic Visual Efficiency in Human Neonates 1
  • References 43
  • Acknowledgments 46
  • Acknowledgments 46
  • 2: Motion Nulling Techniques and Infant Color Vision 47
  • Acknowledgments 73
  • References 73
  • 3: What Can Rates of Development Tell Us About Underlying Mechanisms? 75
  • Acknowledgments 89
  • References 89
  • 4: Perception of Visual Direction in Human Infants 91
  • Acknowledgments 119
  • References 119
  • 5: Kinematic Foundations of Infant Visual Perception 121
  • 5: Kinematic Foundations of Infant Visual Perception 168
  • References 173
  • References 173
  • 6: Infants' Perception of Biomechanical Motions: Intrinsic Image and Knowledge-Based Constraints 175
  • Acknowledgments 214
  • References 214
  • 7: Infants' Sensitivity to Motion-Carried Information for Depth and Object Properties 215
  • Acknowledgments 234
  • References 234
  • 8: Future-Oriented Processes in Infancy: The Case of Visual Expectations 235
  • References 263
  • Conclusion 308
  • Acknowledgments 311
  • References 312
  • 10: Commentary: Extending the IdealObserver Approach 317
  • Acknowledgments 331
  • References 331
  • 11: Commentary: Cheers and Lamentations 333
  • References 344
  • Author Index 345
  • Subject Index 353
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