Daily Life in Chaucer's England

By Jeffrey L. Singman; Will McLean | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

The authors wish to thank the following: Robert Charrette for his purse design; Robert MacPherson for his breech design; Daniel Jennings for his shirt design; Karen Walter for her design for a veil and wimple and for her instructions on gussets; David Meddows-Taylor and John Vernier for their work on earlier drafts of the section on Shoes and Pattens; David Kuijt for the original draft of the section on Cards and for the rules for Karnoeffel and Glic; David Tallan for the original draft of the chapter on Food and Drink and of the recipes for Salad and Mustard; Kitten Reames for the original draft of the section on Spoons; Maren Drees for her work on the recipes; Trish Postle for her research into songs; and Karen Weatherbee for the original draft of the text and illustrations on handwriting.

Illustrations by Poul Norlund of the Herjolfsnes garments appear by permission of Meddelelser om Groenland.

Special credit is due to Kitten Reames for her illustrations of spoons, and to John Vernier for his illustrations of shoes and pattens and of arms and armor.

Special credit is also due to Trish Postle for her settings of Kyrie Eleyson and The False Fox."

The authors also wish to thank the following individuals who assisted in this book in its various incarnations: Elizabeth Bennett, Robert Charrette, David Carroll-Clark, Susan Carroll-Clark, Gerry Embleton, Jeremy Graham, Victoria Hadfield, Marianne Hansen, Tara Jenkins, Daniel Jennings, Wendy McLean, Aryeh Nusbacher, and Karen Walter.

-vii-

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Daily Life in Chaucer's England
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction ix
  • 1 - Historical Background to Chaucer's England 1
  • 2 - Chaucer's World 9
  • 3 - The Course of Life Birth 39
  • 4 - Cycles of Time 61
  • 5 - The Living Environment 79
  • 6 - Clothing and Accessories 93
  • 7 - Arms and Armor 137
  • 8 - Food and Drink 159
  • 9 - Entertainments 179
  • Glossary 215
  • Appendix A: The Medieval Event 221
  • Notes CHAPTER 2: CHAUCER'S WORLD 231
  • Bibliography 241
  • Index 247
  • About the Authors 253
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