African American Authors, 1745-1945: A Bio-Bibliographical Critical Sourcebook

By Emmanuel S. Nelson | Go to book overview

the recitals of ordinary slaves who picture the sordid conditions of the slave past and proceeds to introduce members from the black middle class, also ex-slaves, who help to interpret the present and suggest fruitful plans for the future. Foster perceives the ardent hope of Albert to "charm, subdue and bring forth tears" (150) in the readers just as the speech of Dr. Minor does.

Throughout, the narrator's interruptions provide the necessary links, and hers is the voice of a "concerned Christian" who is determined to prove to her white, Protestant, Christian brethren that the institution of slavery was a "sin against God and mankind" (169), and none could glorify the antebellum days as writers like Nelson Page have done. Foster is not sure if Albert ever had a chance to read Page's "Ole Virginia," but both Page and Albert wrote to remove misconceptions about the slave South, but they differed in their versions of truth. To Page the days of slavery were golden days when all was right with the world. But to Albert they were the days when brutality was in vogue, and both races should thank God slavery has been completely erased from the earth. Both are studies with metaphors like the "house of bondage" and "Ole Virginia," which refer to the South. Albert has not only challenged "the remythologizing of the plantation school" (162), which has romanticized the antebellum South, but also broken other equally popular myths of the "illiteracy, intellectual inferiority and lack of historical perspective" of the blacks. Foster concludes her study reiterating the fact that besides confronting her opponents , Albert has "defined her vision of the community" (176) that could be born in the United States. This she has achieved by using the "discourse of discontent" (164)--which is an African American literary tradition and has given a model that African American women writers could emulate.


BIBLIOGRAPHY

Work by Octavia Victoria Rogers Albert

Slave narrative

The House of Bondage: or Charlotte Brooks and Other Slaves. Ed. Frances Smith Foster. New York: Oxford University Press, 1988.


Studies of Octavia Victoria Rogers Albert

Foster Frances Smith. Written by Herself: Literary Production by African American Women, 1746-1892. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1993.

-----. "Introduction." In The House of Bondage: or Charlotte Brooks and Other Slaves. Ed. Frances Smith Foster, 1988. i-xlii.

The Oxford Companion to African American Literature. Ed. William L. Andrews, Frances Smith Foster , and Trudier Harris. New York: Oxford University Press, 1997. 10- 11.

-12-

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African American Authors, 1745-1945: A Bio-Bibliographical Critical Sourcebook
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface xiii
  • Elizabeth Laura Adams (1909-) 1
  • Bibliography 4
  • Octavia Victoria Rogers Albert (1853-1890 ) 6
  • Bibliography 12
  • James Madison Bell (1826-1902) 13
  • Bibliography 16
  • Gwendolyn Bennett (1902-1981) 18
  • Henry Walton Bibb (1815-1854) 24
  • Marita Bonner (1898-1971) 30
  • Bibliography 34
  • Arna Bontemps (1902-1973) 36
  • Bibliography 40
  • William Stanley Braithwaite (1878-1962) 44
  • Bibliography 48
  • Claude Brown (1937- ) 50
  • Bibliography 56
  • Sterling A. Brown (1901-1989) 57
  • Bibliography 62
  • William Wells Brown (1814-1884) 64
  • Bibliography 69
  • Charles Waddell Chesnutt (1858-1932) 73
  • Bibliography 77
  • Anna Julia Cooper (1858?-1964) 80
  • Bibliography 85
  • Countee Cullen (1903-1946) 88
  • Bibliography 96
  • Lucy A. Delaney (c. 1828-19?) 98
  • Bibliography 100
  • Martin Robinson Delany (1812-1885) 101
  • Bibliography 105
  • Frederick Douglass (1818-1895) 108
  • Bibliography 118
  • W.E.B. Du Bois (1868-1963) 121
  • Bibliography 129
  • Paul Laurence Dunbar (1872-1906) 132
  • Bibliography 136
  • Alice Moore Dunbar- Nelson (1875-1935) 139
  • Bibliography 142
  • Olaudah Equiano (1745-1797) 147
  • Bibliography 153
  • Jessie Redmon Fauset (1882-1961) 155
  • Bibliography 159
  • Rudolph Fisher (1897-1934) 161
  • Bibliography 167
  • Sarah Lee Brown Fleming (1876-1963) 170
  • Bibliography 174
  • Marcus Mosiah Garvey Jr. (1887-1940) 175
  • Edythe Mae Gordon (c. 1898-) 184
  • Sutton E. Griggs (1872-1933) 188
  • Bibliography 192
  • Angelina Weld Grimké (1880-1958) 194
  • Bibliography 197
  • Charlotte Lottie Forten Grimé (1837-1914) 199
  • Bibliography 203
  • Briton Hammon (Late 1720s-) 205
  • Bibliography 207
  • Jupitor Hammon (1711-1806) 209
  • Bibliography 211
  • Frances Ellen Watkins Harper (1825-1911) 213
  • Bibliography 218
  • Juanita Harrison (1891-) 220
  • Bibliography 223
  • George Wylie Henderson (1904-1965) 224
  • Bibliography 228
  • Pauline Elizabeth Hopkins (1859-1930) 231
  • Bibliography 235
  • George Moses Horton (1797-1883) 239
  • James H. W. Howard (1856-) 244
  • Bibliography 248
  • Langston Hughes (1902-1967) 249
  • Bibliography 256
  • Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960) 259
  • Bibliography 265
  • Rebecca Cox Jackson (1795-1871) 270
  • Bibliography 273
  • Harriet Ann Jacobs (c. 1813-1897) 275
  • Bibliography 279
  • Amelia E. Johnson (1858-1922) 280
  • Bibliography 283
  • Georgia Douglas Johnson (18807-1966) 284
  • Bibliography 287
  • Helene Johnson (1906-1995) 290
  • Bibliography 295
  • James Weldon Johnson (1871-1938) 297
  • Bibliography 303
  • Elizabeth Keckley (1818/1819-1907) 306
  • Bibliography 309
  • Emma Dunham Kelley-Hawkins (?-) 311
  • Bibliography 315
  • Nella Larsen (1891-1964) 316
  • Bibliography 321
  • Jarena Lee (1783-) 324
  • Bibliography 327
  • Alain Locke (1886-1954) 329
  • Bibliography 332
  • John Marrant (1755-1791) 334
  • Bibliography 337
  • Claude McKay (1889-1948) 338
  • Bibliography 346
  • Richard Bruce Nugent (1906-1987) 349
  • Bibliography 351
  • Eliza C. Potter (1820-) 353
  • Bibliography 355
  • Mary Prince (c. 1788-) 357
  • Bibliography 360
  • Nancy Prince (1799-c. 1856) 361
  • Bibliography 364
  • Henrietta Cordelia Ray (c.1849-1916) 366
  • Bibliography 369
  • Mary Seacole (1805-1881) 371
  • Bibliography 374
  • Maria W. Stewart (1803-1879) 375
  • Bibliography 378
  • Mary Church Terrell (1863-1954) 379
  • Bibliography 382
  • Lucy Terry (c. 1730-1821) 384
  • Bibliography 385
  • Wallace Thurman (1902-1934) 387
  • Bibliography 392
  • Katherine Davis Chapman Tillman (1870-) 396
  • Bibliography 398
  • Melvin Beaunorus Tolson (1898-1966) 400
  • Bibliography 406
  • Eugene (Jean) Pinchback Toomer (1894-1967) 408
  • Bibliography 415
  • Sojourner Truth (1797, 1800?-1883) 418
  • Bibliography 422
  • David Walker (1785-1830) 424
  • Bibliography 427
  • Eric Walrond (1898-1966) 429
  • Bibliography 436
  • Booker T. Washington (1856-1915) 440
  • Bibliography 446
  • Frank Webb (?-) 448
  • Bibliography 454
  • Ida B. Wells-Barnett (1862-1931) 455
  • Bibliography 459
  • Phillis Wheatley (1754-1784) 463
  • Bibliography 467
  • Walter White (1893-1955) 469
  • Bibliography 472
  • James Monroe Whitfield (1822-1871) 474
  • Bibliography 478
  • Albery Allson Whitman (1851-1901) 479
  • Bibliography 481
  • Harriet E. Wilson (1827?-1863) 483
  • Bibliography 486
  • Richard Wright (1908-1960) 488
  • Bibliography 505
  • Zara Wright (?-) 508
  • Bibliography 511
  • Selected Bibliography 513
  • Index 515
  • About the Editor and Contributors 521
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