Arms Race Theory: Strategy and Structure of Behavior

By Craig Etcheson | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

In the more than a decade this book has been in preparation, literally scores of teachers, colleagues and students have influenced and aided my research. Many of the hundreds of scholars whose work I discuss in this book have generously criticized and assisted various stages of my research. Dozens of librarians, computer technicians, and others have labored selflessly. So many have helped. To list all these people would be too tedious; they know who they are: Thank you all.

Still, I would be remiss if I failed to acknowledge the special debts owed to a special few. James N. Rosenau, Richard K. Ashley, Dwain Mefford, and Walt Scacchi, the members of my graduate committee at the University of Southern California, patiently sustained their criticism over many years. Dina Zinnes and Phil Schrodt, more distant but nonetheless persistent sources of criticism and inspiration, were also of more help than they know. A casual comment about puzzles by Stephen Majeski in Atlanta in the spring of 1984 stimulated me to draft the first three chapters in an eleven day period. Criticism by Stuart Thorson, J. David Singer, Rein Taagepera, and several anonymous reviewers proved valuable late in the manuscript preparation process.

Perhaps the greatest tribute that I can give to these scholars is to note that, even when they disagree with some of my conclusions (as they all do, to one extent or another), their commitment to the process of scholarly inquiry propelled them to make valuable and sustained contributions to my creative spark, such as it is. This gives me confidence that the spirit of criticism evidenced in their commitment will continue to inform progress in our understanding of strategy and the structure of behavior in arms races.

-xi-

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Arms Race Theory: Strategy and Structure of Behavior
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Military Studies ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • INTRODUCTION: STRATEGY AND THE STRUCTURE OF BEHAVIOR IN ARMS RACES 1
  • 1 - The Problem of Interaction in Arms Accumulation 3
  • Notes 17
  • 2 - Theories of Interaction in Arms Accumulation 25
  • Notes 57
  • 3 - Methods for Representing Interaction in Arms Accumulation 75
  • Notes 108
  • 4 - A Computational Model of Arms Accumulation 115
  • Notes 133
  • 5 - Strategies of Arms Accumulation Research 135
  • Notes 155
  • 6 - Summary and Conclusions on Arms Accumulation 159
  • Notes 166
  • APPENDICES 169
  • SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY 183
  • Index 239
  • About the Author 247
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