Arms Race Theory: Strategy and Structure of Behavior

By Craig Etcheson | Go to book overview
§ The trend of scientific investigations in the Richardson Tradition for the last twenty-five years has centered on a variety of increasingly sophisticated attempts to move from description of the general case to an empirically based understanding of the particular by specifying various mathematical structures to explain the interaction, or lack thereof, of military bureaucracies.
§ The cumulative evidence points to bureaucratic and strategic elements that are very difficult to represent and manipulate in a systematic fashion using the traditional mathematical struck.
§ Emancipatory conceptions of strategic interaction remain almost completely undeveloped on the theoretical level, and so it is little surprise to learn that the Richardson Tradition has continued to depend upon static, ahistorical conceptions of strategy.
§ Arms accumulation models have yet to incorporate the full range of insights from studies on organizational behavior, and there is a need to develop conceptual perspectives on arms accumulation that incorporate and integrate Rationalist, Structuralist, and Interactionist organization decision-making paradigms.

Based upon these overall conclusions, it is apparent that much work remains to be done in the Richardson Tradition. These observations suggest that we need particularly to sharpen our theoretical concepts about armaments accumulation patterns and to explore new methodologies for representing the interaction behavior of states in arms races. These are the concerns--the development of adequate conceptual perspectives on and exploration of methodologies for the analysis of arms accumulation behavior--occupying the next two chapters.


Notes
1.
Bertrand Russell, War, the Offspring of Fear ( London: Union of Democratic Control, 1914).
2.
Lewis Fry Richardson, "Threats and Security," in Psychological Factors of Peace and War, ed. T. H. Pear ( London: Hutchinson and Co., 1950), p. 225.
3.
Gregory Bateson, "Culture Contact and Schismogenisis," Man 35 ( 1935), pp. 173-183; also Bateson "The Pattern of an Armaments Race-Part I: An Anthropological Approach," Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists 2 ( 1946), pp. 10-11; and his "The Pattern of an Armaments. Race--Part II: An Analysis of Nationalism," Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists 2 ( 1946), pp. 26-28; Anatol A. Rapoport, "Lewis Fry Richardson's Mathematical Theory of War," Journal of Conflict Resolution 1 ( 1957), pp. 249-299; as well as Rapoport "The Mathematics of Arms Races," in International Politics and Foriegn Policy, ed. James N. Rosenau ( New York: Free Press, 1961), pp. 492-503; his Foreign Games and Debates ( Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1961); and also his "Mathematical Methods in Theories of International Relations: Expectations, Caveats, and Opportunities," in Mathematical Models in International Relations, ed. Dina A. Zinnes and John V. Gillespie ( New York: Praeger, 1976), pp. 10-36; Nicholas Rashevsky, Mathematical Theory and Human Relations: An Approachto a Mathematical Biology of Social Phenomena

-57-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Arms Race Theory: Strategy and Structure of Behavior
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Military Studies ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • INTRODUCTION: STRATEGY AND THE STRUCTURE OF BEHAVIOR IN ARMS RACES 1
  • 1 - The Problem of Interaction in Arms Accumulation 3
  • Notes 17
  • 2 - Theories of Interaction in Arms Accumulation 25
  • Notes 57
  • 3 - Methods for Representing Interaction in Arms Accumulation 75
  • Notes 108
  • 4 - A Computational Model of Arms Accumulation 115
  • Notes 133
  • 5 - Strategies of Arms Accumulation Research 135
  • Notes 155
  • 6 - Summary and Conclusions on Arms Accumulation 159
  • Notes 166
  • APPENDICES 169
  • SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY 183
  • Index 239
  • About the Author 247
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 250

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.