U.S. Domestic and National Security Agendas: Into the Twenty-First Century

By Richard E. Friedman; Sam C. Sarkesian et al. | Go to book overview

Preface

The post-Cold War period has ushered in a complex relationship between domestic and external affairs. Combining changes in the international arena with those occuring in American domestic politics, the security landscape has turned into a confusing and often unpredictable mosaic of conflicts, threats, humanitarian issues, human rights, refugee problems, and regional and international power projections. Complicating this landscape are the changes taking place in American demographics and public opinion about foreign involvement, conflict characteristics, and domestic priorities. Questions regarding the linkage and intermix between domestic politics and policy and national security have become clouded and undefined.

To examine these matters, a workshop in September 1992 at Cantigny, Illinois, focused on "U. S. Domestic and National Security Agendas: Into the Twenty-First Century." The workshop, conducted by the National Strategy Forum and supported by the Robert R. McCormick Tribune Foundation and the U.S. Army War College, brought together military professionals, academics, and government representatives. A series of papers were presented covering three broad areas: Domestic Issues: Shaping the National Security Agenda; The Domestic and International Security Landscapes: Contradictions and Complexities; and National Security: Into the Twenty-first Century. These papers covered subjects ranging from a study of the American economy and defense budget, arms control, and the Gulf War to the national security establishment, Total Force Policy and civil-military relations. Most of these papers have been included in this volume. In addition, the introductory chapter offers a broad landscape of the domestic and national security linkages, and the concluding chapter identifies the major themes emerging from the chapters and provides commentary about the future.

No attempt has been made by the editors to structure or reshape the papers to fit a particular theme or format. We believe that each author brings

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