U.S. Domestic and National Security Agendas: Into the Twenty-First Century

By Richard E. Friedman; Sam C. Sarkesian et al. | Go to book overview

But even in such instances, linkages remain between domestic and national security agendas. Without such distinctions, however, it is easy to argue that every domestic issue is also a national security issue. The policy and political turmoil emerging from such a concept will surely diffuse and denigrate national security policy to a meaningless exercise.

In this period of transition, it is clear that efforts must be undertaken by the military and national security establishment as well as by political leaders to develop and sustain a degree of awareness and sensitivity of the American people to the continuing dangers in the external world, to the reality that the end of the Cold War did not necessarily bring peace. Indeed, the "fog of peace" seems to have made it more difficult to design a strategic vision that clarifies U.S. national interests in the new world order. And in such circumstances it is important that the notion of national security not be so separated from domestic concerns that it becomes isolated along with the military instrument. Without such efforts, national will, political resolve, and staying power may be lacking in meeting serious threats that may emerge in the future. Without such efforts, sometime in the future the United States may be faced with a serious security threat that triggers a precipitous response and an open-ended commitment that leads to, yes, another Vietnam.


NOTES
1.
David Jablonsky, Why Is Strategy Difficult? (Carlisle Barracks, PA: Strategic Studies Institute, June 1, 1992), p. 52.
2.
John Chipman, "The Future of Strategic Studies," Survival: The IISS Quarterly, 34, no. 1 (Spring 1992), p. 112.
3.
For a more detailed review see S. J. Deitchman, Beyond the Thaw: A New National Strategy ( Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1991), pp. 11-22.
4.
"National (in) Security," Courier (The Stanley Foundation), no. 12 (Winter 1993), p. 9.
5.
See Peter Braestrup, Big Story: How the American Press and Television Reported and Interpreted the Crisis of Tet 1968 in Vietnam and Washington ( Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1977).
6.
Deitchman, p. 41.
7.
Aaron Wildavsky, "The Two Presidencies," Trans-Action, no. 4 ( December 1966), pp. 7-14.
8.
National Military Strategy of the United States ( Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, January 1992).
9.
Lt. Gen. Frederic J. Brown, USA (Ret.), "The U.S. Army in Transition II: Landpower in the Information Age" ( Washington, DC: Brassey's [U.S.], 1993), p. 7. See also General Gordon R. Sullivan and Lieutenant Colonel James Dubik, Land Warfare in the 21st Century (Carlisle Barracks, PA: Strategic Studies Institute, February 1993).
10.
Peter G. Peterson with James K. Sebenius, "The Primacy of the Domestic Agenda," in Graham Allison and Gregory Treverton, eds., Rethinking America's Security: Beyond Cold War to New World Order ( New York: Norton, 1992), p. 58.

-21-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
U.S. Domestic and National Security Agendas: Into the Twenty-First Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 260

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.