U.S. Domestic and National Security Agendas: Into the Twenty-First Century

By Sam C. Sarkesian; John Mead Flanagin et al. | Go to book overview

ficient antidote to the threat of foreign control over U.S. military industrial and foreign policy.

As Raymond Vernon argues, in the new global economy "no country can hope to maintain an autarkic policy . . . except at significant cost in terms of the efficiency of its military establishment. 96 A 1991 Department of Defense report to Congress expresses optimism that a globalized defense sector can be managed to the advantage of U.S. national security interests. It states that the government has the proper tools to protect U.S. national security from undue foreign control while ensuring domestic defense companies continued access to foreign capital. The Pentagon also states that it can identify and manage the continued supply of critical materiel and is confident of its ability to establish a second, domestic source for critical materials if there is a risk that continued supply from a foreign source may be interrupted. 97 This chapter supports that conclusion. The United States, at this particular juncture of history, is in a unique position to provide leadership in the world's military-industrial sector, the arms trade, and in arms control initiatives. May it use this opportunity wisely.


NOTES
1.
Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) Defense Industrial Base Project, Deterrence in Decay: The Future of the U.S. Industrial Base, Final Report of the CSIS Defense Industrial Base Project ( Washington, DC: Center for Strategic and International Studies, May 1989), p. 2; Defense Science Board, The Defense Industrial and Technology Base, Final Report of the Defense Science Board ( Washington, DC: Office of the Undersecretary of Defense for Acquisition, October 1988), Vols. 1 and 2.
2.
Much of the debate has focused on the U.S. defense-industrial base. See: Undersecretary of Defense (Acquisition) and Assistant Secretary of Defense (Production and Logistics), Report to Congress on the Defense Industrial Base ( Washington, DC: Office of the Undersecretary of Defense for Acquisition, November 1991); Center for Strategic and International Studies, Deterrence in Decay; Undersecretary of State (Acquisition), Bolstering Defense Industrial Competitiveness ( Washington, DC: Office of the Undersecretary of Defense for Acquisition, July 1988); Final Report of the Defense Science Board 1988 Summer Study on The Defense Industrial Technology Base, Vol. 2 ( Washington, DC: Office of the Undersecretary of Defense for Acquisition, December 1988); General Accounting Office, Industrial Base Defense-Critical Industries ( Washington, DC; Government Printing Office, August 1988).
3.
The White House, National Security Strategy of the United States ( Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, January 1987); National Security Strategy of the United States, January 1988; National Security Strategy of the United States, March 1990; National Security Strategy of the United States, August 1991; cited by James Miskel, "Domestic Industry and National Security," Strategic Review, 19, no. 4 (Fall 1991), p. 24, notes 2 and 3.

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