U.S. Domestic and National Security Agendas: Into the Twenty-First Century

By Sam C. Sarkesian; John Mead Flanagin et al. | Go to book overview

and seemingly in harmony with the prerequisites of just war theory. Could this be manipulated to lead us into more rather than fewer wars? It may be possible to wield the military instrument with greater discrimination and selectivity, provided the ends are as thoughtfully considered as the means. However, this increasingly discriminate capability may result in temptations to employ the military instrument more often in support of broader, less cleanly defined national interests.

None of this has a significant impact on U.S. military force posture if the current tenets of readiness, agility, and versatility are maintained. What will be required for the future is greater attention to ends. Of greatest importance is the strategic decision-making process that must produce proper focus and depth of thinking to provide precise direction, right and left limits, and all those other incalculables required for effective prosecution of war that meet just war criteria. We have an increasing capability to conduct war according to just war principles, particularly in terms of proportionality. Structural changes within the services are already underway and will result in more versatile, rapidly deployable forces with ultra-high-tech capabilities. But the most important questions have little to do with technology. Instead we must answer the question: Why apply military power at all? And if it is to be applied, to what long-term end? If we can force ourselves to answer these questions wisely, within the moral limits of just war theory, perhaps we will find ourselves en route to true peace and stability.


NOTES

The views expressed are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the Department of the Army, Department of Defense, or the U.S. Government.

1.
Russell F. Weigley, The American Way of War: A History of United States Military Strategy and Policy ( Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1977). (Originally published as part of The Wars of the United States series [ New York: Macmillan, 1973].)
3.
"Iraq," The Economist Intelligence Unit, 2 ( 1992), pp. 12-13.
4.
Robert W. Tucker and David C. Hendrickson, The Imperial Temptation: The New World Order and America's Purpose ( New York: Council on Foreign Relations, 1992). See chap. 12, "The Responsibilities of Victory," pp. 142-151.
5.
Ibid., pp. 143 and 145. For a discussion of the prospects of democracy in the region, see Ali Hillal Dessouki, "The Postwar Arab World," Journal of Democracy 2, no. 3 (Summer 1991), pp. 63-67.
6.
Caspar W. Weinberger, "The Use of Force and the National Will," Baltimore Sun, December 3, 1984, p. 11.
7.
Samuel J. Newland and Douglas V. Johnson II, "The Military and Operational Significance of the Weinberger Doctrine," in Alan Ned Sabrosky and Robert L. Sloane , eds., Recourse to War: An Analysis of the "Weinberger Doctrine." ( Carlisle Barracks, PA: Strategic Studies Institute, 1988), pp. 115-142.

-154-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
U.S. Domestic and National Security Agendas: Into the Twenty-First Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 260

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.