Atypical Cognitive Deficits in Developmental Disorders: Implications for Brain Function

By Sarah H. Broman; Jordan Grafman | Go to book overview

elaboration of affective and communicative reactions and knowledge would not necessarily lead to their regression or loss.

Structures other than the cerebellum (e.g., limbic, cerebral) and neural functions other than attentional are undoubtedly involved in the social, language, and cognitive deficits seen in autism. These considerations are the topic of future discussions (e.g., Townsend, 1992).


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Supported by funds from National Institute of Mental Health Grant 1-RO1- MH36840 and National Institute or Neurological Disorders and Stroke Grant 5-ROI-NS19855 awarded to Eric Courchesne. We thank Lynne Lord for her technical assistance with magnetic resonance imaging, and Robert Elmasian and Kristina Ciesielski for assistance with ERP studies preliminary to those presented herein. Portions of this work and the theory described were presented at the National Conference of the Autism Society of America ( 1989, 1990, & 1991) and at the National Institute of Mental Health ( 1985).


REFERENCES

Akshoomoff N. ( 1992). Neuropsychological studies of attention and the role of the cerebellum. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of California, San Diego, and San Diego State University.

Akshoomoff N., & Courchesne E. ( 1992). A new role of the cerebellum in cognitive operations. Behavioral Neuroscience, 106, 731-738.

Akshoomoff N., Courchesne E., Press G., & Iraqui V. ( 1992). "Contribution of the cerebellum to neuropsychological functioning: Evidence from a case of cerebellar degeneration disorder". Neuropsychologia, 30, 315-328.

American Psychiatric Association. ( 1980). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders ( 3rd ed.). Washington, DC: Author.

American Psychiatric Association. ( 1987). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders ( 3rd ed., rev.). Washington, DC: Author.

Angevine J. B. Jr., Mancall E. L., & Yakovlev P. I. ( 1961). The human cerebellum: An atlas of gross topography in serial section. Boston: Little, Brown.

Arin D. M., Bauman M. I., & Kemper T. L. ( 1991). "The distribution of Purkinje cell loss in the cerebellum in autism". Neurology, 41 (Suppl. 1), 307.

Bakeman R., & Adamson L. B. ( 1984). "Coordinating attention to people and objects in mother-infant and peer-infant interaction". Child Development, 55, 1278-1289.

Bartak L., Rutter M. & Cox A. ( 1975). "A comparative study of infantile autism and specific developmental receptive language disorder: 1. The children". British Journal of Psychiatry, 126, 127-145.

Bauman M. L. ( 1991). "Microscopic neuroanatomic abnormalities in autism". Pediatrics, 87, 791-796.

Bauman M. L., & Kemper T. ( 1985). "Histoanatomic observations of the brain in early infantile autism". Neurology, 35, 866-874.

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