Development of Orthographic Knowledge and the Foundations of Literacy: A Memorial Festschrift for Edmund H. Henderson

By Shane Templeton; Donald R. Bear | Go to book overview

In Memoriam

Edmund Hardcastle Henderson, Professor and Director of the McGuffey Reading Center at the University of Virginia, passed away in October of 1989, at his home in Charlottesville. His life was devoted to sharing with his students, and in turn their students, his enthusiasm and honesty in research and instruction in reading and orthography.

A former classroom teacher, he undertook graduate study in Reading Education with Russell Stauffer at the University of Delaware. After completing his doctorate, he directed the Reading Clinic at Delaware for 7 years before taking over as Director of the McGuffey Reading Center. His efforts and influence have spread well beyond the academical village of the University of Virginia. Over the years he authored countless articles and book chapters. He authored two textbooks and he was the senior author of a spelling series. In 1985 he established the George Graham Lectures at the University of Virginia in honor and memory of one of his former students; the Lectures have brought distinguished researchers in reading and reading-related disciplines to the University to discuss their work with other researchers and classroom teachers. In 1990, he was posthumously awarded the Outstanding Teacher Educator in Reading Award from the International Reading Association.

The present volume began as an attempt to bring together in one place the significant studies undertaken over the past 10 years by several of Edmund Henderson's former students. He was one of the original editors. His untimely passing changed in part the mission of the volume. It is offered now as a Memorial Festschrift. Traditionally, a Festschrift is a celebration presented to a revered scholar and mentor. It would be fitting to think of this work, still, as a celebration, still a Festschrift, for a beloved professor, mentor, and colleague. And it is probably fitting that this Festschrift includes a contribution by the honoree himself.

This volume is offered therefore in affectionate memory of Edmund Hardcastle Henderson--his life, his work, his teaching, his legacy. There is no doubt that we will miss him. There is likewise no doubt that his work will continue.

-iii-

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