Development of Orthographic Knowledge and the Foundations of Literacy: A Memorial Festschrift for Edmund H. Henderson

By Shane Templeton; Donald R. Bear | Go to book overview

1 The Interface of Lexical Competence and Knowledge of Written Words

Edmund H. Henderson University of Virginia

In this chapter I will relate research about spoken and written language to the teaching of reading and writing. My intention is to provide a background for and a prelude to the particular studies and essays that will comprise the successive chapters in this volume. To accomplish this aim it will be necessary to sketch in a wonderfully broad and complex terrain of scholarship, a playing field upon which some of the finest scholars of our century have labored. As for the whole of this work let it be said at the outset that I agree with Huey ( 1908/ 1968) on two points. We still may hope at best for penultimate knowledge of our topic (p. 6). Nonetheless, we are "working toward daylight" (p. 102).

How should we tackle a topic this complex? One feels like the first designer of the parachute pack. One knows how it should look in the end, but facing thousands of square feet of silk, where does one make the first fold? My scheme will be to declare at the outset what I conceive to be the delimiting parameters of reading and writing. Both I think are incredibly complex but only subtly cognitive behaviors. My position is that while we may have learned something about reading behavior and its neural architecture, we are light years away from understanding comprehension as a psychological construct. We should take our guidance for exercising the latter from philosophers and poets.

Second, in this chapter I intend to draw upon my reading and thought about the origins of spoken and written language as these have been dealt with over recent years and with the history of written English. With some notable exceptions ( Horn, 1957; Venezky, 1967, for example), this rich source has been largely neglected since Huey's very interesting accounting in 1908. I will argue in fact that these evolutionary events provide a powerful source of understanding about when and how children learn to read and write.

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Development of Orthographic Knowledge and the Foundations of Literacy: A Memorial Festschrift for Edmund H. Henderson
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 372

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.