Development of Orthographic Knowledge and the Foundations of Literacy: A Memorial Festschrift for Edmund H. Henderson

By Shane Templeton; Donald R. Bear | Go to book overview

4 The Relationship between Word Recognition and Spelling

J. Thomas Gill University of Virginia

We can recognize a Rembrandt even though we cannot produce one. A young child can follow a verbal request to get his or her shoes while his or her oral language consists only of word-like babblings. Commonplace phenomena such as these have led us to take for granted the dichotomy between the processes of production and recognition. Likewise, as they learn to read, children and adults can frequently read words that they cannot correctly spell. Thus, many have assumed that word recognition and spelling are two separate skills.

Asch and Ebeuholtz ( 1962), however, argued that associations formed in one direction should be able to be used in the opposite direction. The discovery that children's misspellings reveal the present status of their orthographic theories or word knowledge presents a way to test this principle. It is the purpose of this chapter to review the separatist position and to contest it with evidence in support of a centralized cognitive system for spelling and word recognition, as well as to suggest how such a system might work.


SPELLING AND WORD RECOGNITION AS SEPARATE

Today, we take for granted the separation in the curriculum between reading and spelling instruction, but it has not always been this way. Prior to the turn of the century, the ABC method had predominated for almost 200 years. By this method, children said the names of the letters in a word and then pronounced the word again. The first English textbooks for teaching reading were spelling books and Noah Webster designed the first American spelling book, the "Blue-backed Speller," based on this model. The Blue-backed Speller was the primary reading

-79-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Development of Orthographic Knowledge and the Foundations of Literacy: A Memorial Festschrift for Edmund H. Henderson
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 372

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.