The Transformation of European Politics, 1763-1848

By Paul W. Schroeder | Go to book overview

8
Napoleon's Empire and the International System

NAPOLEON'S Empire reached its zenith in 1809; all his later annexations and campaigns really weakened it. This is therefore the point at which to discuss its nature and its impact on Europe. Both subjects are controversial, and include the question of whether it had any lasting impact at all. Thomas Nipperdey begins his magisterial history of nineteenth-century Germany with the words, 'In the beginning was Napoleon'. With him came Germany's breakthrough to modernity, bourgeois society, and the strong centralized state. But Nipperdey's view has been challenged, and Louis Bergeron's equally authoritative work on French history in the Napoleonic era suggests in its title, L'Épisode napoléonien, his belief that Napoleon changed little in the deeper rhythms of French life -- demography, social structure, religious, cultural, and intellectual life, and economics. Not only the Empire's overall results, but also the individual aspects of its putative legacy in France and Europe -- modernization, centralization, the rationalization of politics and public life, industrialization and economic progress, advances toward social and legal equality, democracy, nationalism, state-building -- remain topics of debate.

In contrast, the question of how the Empire affected international politics and the international system has provoked little controversy in recent decades. Historians may differ over the kind of empire it was and the type of imperialism it represented, and on occasion still speculate, as they once commonly did, on how European history might have been altered had the Empire survived instead of collapsing in military defeat. But given the actual course of events, it seems obvious that in international history the Empire was a brief, sensational episode with no lasting consequences; the spectacular rise of a military leader and the state he commanded to unprecedented power and glory, followed by their even swifter fall and a restoration of the old balance-of- power system.

Neither the purpose of this book nor its author's expertise justify any confident judgements about Napoleon's overall legacy.

-371-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Transformation of European Politics, 1763-1848
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 898

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.