Mysticism: Christian and Buddhist

By Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki | Go to book overview

VII.
Kono-mama ("I Am That I Am"1)

I

THE RELIGIOUS consciousness is awakened when we encounter a network of great contradictions running through our human life. When this consciousness comes to itself we feel as if our being were on the verge of a total collapse. We cannot regain the sense of security until we take hold of something overriding the contradictions.

Whatever contradictions we may experience they would not trouble us unless we were philosophers, because each one of us is not supposed to be a thinker of some kind. The contradictions however in most cases assert themselves in the field of the will. When we are assailed on this side, the question is felt most acutely, like a piercing arrow. When the will to power is exposed to constant threat in one form or another, one cannot help becoming meditative about life.

"What is the meaning of life?" then demands not an abstract solution but comes upon one as a concrete personal challenge. The solution must be in terms of experience. We then abandon all the contradictions that appear on the plane of

____________________
1
"And God said unto Moses, I am that I am: and he said, Thus shalt thou say unto the children of Israel, I am hath sent one unto you." Exodus, 3:14.

-143-

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Mysticism: Christian and Buddhist
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • BOARD OF EDITORS of WORLD PERSPECTIVES iv
  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • World Perspectives ix
  • Preface xix
  • Section One 1
  • I. Meister Eckhart and Buddhism 3
  • Ii. the Basis of Buddhist Philosophy 36
  • Iii. "A Little Point" and Satori 76
  • Iv. Living in the Light of Eternity 93
  • Appendices 113
  • V. Transmigration 115
  • Vi. Crucifixion and Enlightenment 129
  • Section Two 141
  • Vii. Kono-Mama ("I Am That I Am") 143
  • Appendices 159
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