The Saturday Review Treasury

By John Haverstick | Go to book overview

THE
Saturday Review
TREASURY

A VOLUME OF GOOD READING
SELECTED FROM THE COMPLETE FILES
BY JOHN HAVERSTICK AND
THE EDITORS OF THE SATURDAY REVIEW

Introduction by
Joseph Wood Krutch

SIMON AND SCHUSTER NEW YORK 1957

-iii-

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The Saturday Review Treasury
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Introduction xvii
  • A Night in The White House 1
  • The Moral Adequacy Of Naturalism 9
  • Four Ca1rtoons 19
  • The Red Peril 22
  • The Earlier Lewis 30
  • Plays and Landscapes 36
  • Tendencies In Modern Fiction 39
  • One Way To Write Novels 44
  • The Story of a Novel 54
  • How I Write Short Stories 81
  • God's Little Acre 89
  • The Sources Of Anthony Adverse 98
  • Freud and The Future 115
  • Fashions in Ideas 124
  • Play in Poetry 133
  • Two Decades Of Saturday Re Vie W Poetry 142
  • The Boyhood of The Wright Brothers 168
  • Aristocratic Rebels 172
  • So You Want To Be a Writer? 182
  • How to Mark a Book 188
  • Some Postscripts To Oscar Wilde 193
  • The Artist And His Times 199
  • The Idea of Happiness 206
  • What I Learned About Congress 214
  • Count No Count 230
  • Must We Hate To Fight? 233
  • How to Suffocate The English Language 235
  • Unlocking the Door To Joyce 239
  • In Memory Of George Gershwin 249
  • Shall We Have A World Language? 255
  • My Student Days In Germany 260
  • The Great Feud 265
  • The Sinner-Saint As Host 282
  • Duet on a Bus 288
  • Genius in The Madhouse 292
  • Adventures In Starting A Literary Magazine 297
  • Why I Remain a Negro 306
  • I- Discovered Jazz In America 315
  • The Comics. . . Very Funny! 318
  • My Brother, Sherwood Anderson 325
  • The Life Of the Party 333
  • American Tragedy 344
  • Don't Shoot The Pianist 352
  • Does Our Art Impress Europe? 357
  • The Strange Death Of Edgar Allan Poe 365
  • Where The Song Begins 376
  • What Does It Take To Enjoy a Poem? 385
  • Poetry: 1949-1956 394
  • Rain 401
  • An Echo Sonnet 402
  • Text for Grandma Moses 402
  • Sister 404
  • "J.B." the Prologue to the Play 405
  • Notes For An Autobiography By Albert Einstein 420
  • The Philosopher- In-The-Making 438
  • How Music Happens By Paul Hindemith 462
  • The Natural Superiority of Women By Ashley Montagu 468
  • Is Our Common Man Too Common? 478
  • The Big Libel 489
  • Through History With J. Wesley Smith 493
  • Book Marks 496
  • Washington, A.C.-D.C. 497
  • New York, C'Est Formidable! 500
  • They'Re Selling Your Unconscious 503
  • The Day After We Land on Mars 521
  • Random Thoughts On Random Dogs 529
  • What Makes a Genius? 532
  • The Rise and Fall Of Horatio Alger 550
  • Man Makes His First Star 556
  • The Future of Form In Jazz 561
  • Think of a Man 568
  • Index 581
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