The African American Theatre Directory, 1816-1960: A Comprehensive Guide to Early Black Theatre Organizations, Companies, Theatres, and Performing Groups

By Bernard L. Peterson Jr. | Go to book overview

CONTRIBUTORS AND RESEARCH CONSULTANTS

GEORGIA ALLEN (research consultant) is an actress, director, and former public school teacher. She was a repertory player in the Atlanta academic and regional theatre prior to appearing on Broadway (Red, White, and Maddox), in television ( "In the Heat of the Night," "I'll Fly Away," and "The Catlins"), and in films ( Guyana Tragedy, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, and Mayflower Madam).

LEONARD R. BALLOU (research consultant) is an organist, archivist, author, and Director of Planning and Institutional Studies at Elizabeth City State University, Elizabeth City, North Carolina. He has written numerous monographs on African American educators in the state of North Carolina and Virginia, and is an authority on African American music and black academic institutions.

H. D. FLOWERS II (research consultant), currently Professor of English, Elizabeth City State University, Elizabeth City, North Carolina, was for many years director of the Henderson-Davis Players at South Carolina State University in Orangeburg. He has also been publicity director of the National Association of Dramatic and Speech Arts. In addition to his Ph.D. dissertation on academic theatre at black institutions, he is the author of two books on African American theatre.

CHRISTINE RAUCHFUSS GRAY (research consultant) is currently teaching at Cantonsville Community College, outside Baltimore. She recently received her doctorate from the University of Maryland at College Park, where she also conducted an honors seminar. She wrote her dissertation on "Willis Richardson and African American Drama of the 1920s" and also edited and contributed the

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The African American Theatre Directory, 1816-1960: A Comprehensive Guide to Early Black Theatre Organizations, Companies, Theatres, and Performing Groups
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Notes xv
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • Preface xxi
  • Abbreviations xxiii
  • SYMBOLS xxvii
  • A 3
  • B 26
  • C 38
  • D 54
  • E 63
  • F 69
  • G 77
  • H 85
  • I 104
  • J 106
  • K 110
  • L 116
  • M 131
  • N 142
  • O 157
  • P 161
  • Q-R 171
  • S 179
  • T 191
  • U-V 197
  • W-Y 200
  • Appendix A BLACK-ORIENTED AND BLACK­ CONTROLLED THEATRES, HALLS, AND PERFORMANCE SPACES 207
  • Appendix B CLASSIFICATION OF BLACK THEATRE ORGANIZATIONS, COMPANIES, AND PERFORMING GROUPS BY TYPE 215
  • INFORMATION SOURCES 239
  • INDEX OF NAMES 247
  • INDEX OF BLACK THEATRICAL ORGANIZATIONS AND THEATRES 271
  • INDEX OF SHOW TITLES 289
  • CONTRIBUTORS AND RESEARCH CONSULTANTS 299
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