Presidential Frontiers: Underexplored Issues in White House Politics

By Ryan J. Barilleaux | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

In more than one way, this volume marks the twentieth anniversary of my career as a professional student of political science. In the fall of 1976, I was an eager sophomore at the University of Southwestern Louisiana, a political science major on an academic scholarship who wanted to make a splash in the world but was unsure of how to proceed. That semester changed my life, for I came under the benevolent influence of Professor Herbert M. Levine.

I entered Herb Levine's course on International Politics without quite knowing what I was getting into. He was a legend on campus, although I did not yet know the legend. He was famous as a demanding teacher, a prolific author, and a man of sharp wit. He dreamed big dreams for his students and sent them off into the wide world. For a student body composed mostly of young people from Louisiana, he was a New Yorker who had (and frequently brought to campus) friends and acquaintances in Britain, New York, Washington, and who knew where else. He usually taught at 8:00 in the morning, so he could devote much of the rest of the day to writing. I often dragged myself out of bed early to visit him during his 7:00 A.M. office hours. His class involved lots of reading, a daily quiz on the reading, extensive note-taking, a "killer" research paper, and several exams. It was the hardest course I had in four years of college and the most rewarding.

Herb Levine possessed a quality that I think is essential to a great teacher: he inspired in me--and in a number of students over the years--the desire to please and impress him. In order to win his admiration, I reorganized my life around his class. I spent hours in the library researching my paper topic; I pulled the only all-night study sessions of my college career in preparation for his exams; I wrote and rewrote everything he would see; and I read every word he assigned or recommended. He taught me how to be a scholar, how to be a better

-ix-

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Presidential Frontiers: Underexplored Issues in White House Politics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Part I - The First Frontier: The Nature of the Office 1
  • Chapter 1 - The Normative Study of the Presidency 3
  • Notes 17
  • Chapter 2 - The President as Representative 23
  • Notes 34
  • References 35
  • Chapter 3 Washington And/Or Versailles: the White House as a Court Society 37
  • References 51
  • Chapter 4 - Electing Presidents and Other Potentates 53
  • Part II - New Insights on Power and Policy 77
  • Chapter 5 - The Overlooked Relevance of the Pardon Power 79
  • References 96
  • Chapter 6 - The Presidency and Social Policy 99
  • References 114
  • Chapter 7 - The Other Side of War: Presidential Peace Powers 119
  • References 133
  • Chapter 8 - The President and Federal Reserve Nominations 135
  • References 146
  • Part III - New Political and Cultural Frontiers 149
  • Chapter 9 - The Presidency as a Cultural Pulpit 151
  • References 175
  • Chapter 10 - The Other Side of Power: Who Is Left Out of Presidential Rhetoric? 179
  • References 190
  • Chapter 11 - First Partner: First Ladies and Their Roles 195
  • Appendix 221
  • Notes 223
  • References 223
  • Afterword 227
  • References 230
  • Index 231
  • About the Contributors 235
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