Presidential Frontiers: Underexplored Issues in White House Politics

By Ryan J. Barilleaux | Go to book overview

Finally, in Chapter 8, Russell Lightfoot and Scott Huffmon bring to light the importance of presidential nominations beyond those to the Supreme Court and cabinet. Specifically, Lightfoot and Huffmon examine nominations to the Federal Reserve Board, an institution that has tremendous power over the lives and fortunes of Americans but that has been generally overlooked by students of presidential power.

In Part III, the contributors turn to "New Political and Cultural Frontiers." In Chapter 9, Kevan M. Yenerall looks at the intensive attention given to cultural issues in the Clinton presidency. His chapter breaks new ground by systematically studying the presidency as a "cultural pulpit" from which chief executives expound on issues such as school uniforms, the family, and social relations among Americans. In Chapter 10, Mary E. Stuckey and Richard Morris argue that we can understand presidential rhetoric and power differently if we apply insights drawn from new perspectives. Specifically, they call upon Native American sources to provide an alternative conception of leadership than is usually found in political science. Finally, in Chapter 11, Pamela J. Van Zwaluwenburg applies techniques of systematic data analysis to the First Ladies of the United States, attempting to move beyond anecdotal and biographical treatments. Her research looks for evidence of factors affecting how individual First Ladies fulfill the various roles inherent in the status of being the president's spouse.

Each chapter contains recommendations for future research in the areas examined by these scholars. In the Afterword, I try to sketch out a research agenda for pushing farther out into the frontiers of the presidency. I make no claim that this volume is exhaustive. It takes on some issues that need more attention; certainly, others remain to be explored. To those readers who wonder why one topic or another has not been included, I respond simply, "Thanks for pointing that out. Now get to work."

When I began my career as a professional student of the presidency in 1980, 1 was attracted not only by the subject itself but also by the fact that there was plenty of work to be done in the field. As those of us studying the presidency compared ourselves to aspiring scholars of voting behavior or British politics, for example, we saw that we were getting in on the ground floor. There, were ample opportunities to carve out significant niches for ourselves in the scholarly community. Today, nearly two decades later, those opportunities still exist. As I hope this volume demonstrates, the frontier is not yet closed.

-xiii-

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Presidential Frontiers: Underexplored Issues in White House Politics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Part I - The First Frontier: The Nature of the Office 1
  • Chapter 1 - The Normative Study of the Presidency 3
  • Notes 17
  • Chapter 2 - The President as Representative 23
  • Notes 34
  • References 35
  • Chapter 3 Washington And/Or Versailles: the White House as a Court Society 37
  • References 51
  • Chapter 4 - Electing Presidents and Other Potentates 53
  • Part II - New Insights on Power and Policy 77
  • Chapter 5 - The Overlooked Relevance of the Pardon Power 79
  • References 96
  • Chapter 6 - The Presidency and Social Policy 99
  • References 114
  • Chapter 7 - The Other Side of War: Presidential Peace Powers 119
  • References 133
  • Chapter 8 - The President and Federal Reserve Nominations 135
  • References 146
  • Part III - New Political and Cultural Frontiers 149
  • Chapter 9 - The Presidency as a Cultural Pulpit 151
  • References 175
  • Chapter 10 - The Other Side of Power: Who Is Left Out of Presidential Rhetoric? 179
  • References 190
  • Chapter 11 - First Partner: First Ladies and Their Roles 195
  • Appendix 221
  • Notes 223
  • References 223
  • Afterword 227
  • References 230
  • Index 231
  • About the Contributors 235
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