Presidential Frontiers: Underexplored Issues in White House Politics

By Ryan J. Barilleaux | Go to book overview
Jesse Helms and Trent Lott. Furthermore, the timing of the affair, just prior to the Democratic Convention, indicates that the leak was stimulated by an intramural dispute. Had the Republicans been responsible, it is much more likely that the leak would have occurred during the general election campaign.
8.
There are many rumors as to the identity of Deep Throat. Clearly, Deep Throat would have had a personal interest in embarrassing the administration. For example, H. R. Haldeman thinks that Fred Fielding, a deputy to John Dean, acted as Deep Throat to retaliate and to protect himself against the attempt to use his boss as a "fall guy" for the Watergate Affair ( Ehrlichman 1982: 85).
9.
In particular, Alice Rivlin, Laura Tyson, and Dee Dee Myers have all had formal positions of prominence in the Clinton White House. Nevertheless, by the second term they were all gone. Furthermore, while they worked in the White House, they were never reported to be in a position of great influence in the president's court.
10.
Bruce Buchanan notes that deference not only has a negative effect in the short term, but also has a cumulative, deleterious effect in the long term ( Buchanan 1978: 53- 75).
11.
Prior to 1939 when the EOP was created, President Roosevelt had a total staff of thirty-seven. In 1995 the presidential branch had eleven separate divisions, a budget of $172 million, and a staff of 1,600 ( Hart, 1995: 5).

REFERENCES

Birnbaum Jeffrey H. 1996. Madhouse: The Private Turmoil of Working for the President. New York: Random House.

Buchanan Bruce. 1978. The Presidential Experience: What the Office Does to the Man. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.

Burke John P. 1984. "Responsibilities of Presidents and Advisers: A Theory and Case Study of Vietnam Decision Making." Journal of Politics ( 46): 818-45.

-----. 1992. The Institutional Presidency. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press.

Clifford Clark with Richard Holbrooke. 1991. Counsel to the President. New York: Random House.

de Sanche Gramont, ed. and trans. 1963. The Age of Magnificence: The Memoirs of the Duc de Saint-Simon. New York: Capricorn Books.

Dexter Lewis A. 1977. "Court Politics: Presidential Staff Relations as a Special Case of a General Phenomenon." Administration and Society 9(3): 267-83.

Ehrlichman John. 1982. Witness to Power: The Nixon Years. New York: Simon & Schuster.

Elias Norbert. 1983. The Court Society. Trans. Edmund Jephcott. New York: Pantheon Books.

Hart John. 1995. The Presidential Branch: From Washington to Clinton, 2nd ed. Chatham, NJ: Chatham Publishers.

Janis Irving L. 1982. Groupthink, 2nd ed. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.

Magruder Jeb Stuart. 1974. An American Life. New York: Atheneum.

Mitchell Alison. 1996. "A Political Troubleshooter Is Clinton's Point Man." New York Times, August 26, NYT Internet Web Site.

Morris Richard S. 1997. Behind the Oval Office: Winning the Presidency in the Nineties. New York: Random House.

-51-

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Presidential Frontiers: Underexplored Issues in White House Politics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Part I - The First Frontier: The Nature of the Office 1
  • Chapter 1 - The Normative Study of the Presidency 3
  • Notes 17
  • Chapter 2 - The President as Representative 23
  • Notes 34
  • References 35
  • Chapter 3 Washington And/Or Versailles: the White House as a Court Society 37
  • References 51
  • Chapter 4 - Electing Presidents and Other Potentates 53
  • Part II - New Insights on Power and Policy 77
  • Chapter 5 - The Overlooked Relevance of the Pardon Power 79
  • References 96
  • Chapter 6 - The Presidency and Social Policy 99
  • References 114
  • Chapter 7 - The Other Side of War: Presidential Peace Powers 119
  • References 133
  • Chapter 8 - The President and Federal Reserve Nominations 135
  • References 146
  • Part III - New Political and Cultural Frontiers 149
  • Chapter 9 - The Presidency as a Cultural Pulpit 151
  • References 175
  • Chapter 10 - The Other Side of Power: Who Is Left Out of Presidential Rhetoric? 179
  • References 190
  • Chapter 11 - First Partner: First Ladies and Their Roles 195
  • Appendix 221
  • Notes 223
  • References 223
  • Afterword 227
  • References 230
  • Index 231
  • About the Contributors 235
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