Presidential Frontiers: Underexplored Issues in White House Politics

By Ryan J. Barilleaux | Go to book overview

Chapter 10
The Other Side of Power: Who Is Left Out of Presidential Rhetoric?

MARY E. STUCKEY AND RICHARD MORRIS

... when the idea of Indian tribes as nations is voiced, many Americans laugh at the pretention, convinced that Indians have some primitive delusion of grandeur that has certainly been erased by history.

Deloria & Lytle, 1984

There is a long tradition of political science research that explicitly questions the meaning of "democracy" in a nation that, despite its rhetorical commitment to the themes of political equality and individual liberty, seems persistently to pursue policies that contravene those same principles. As a critique of ideology, this investigative impulse can be traced back to the writings of the anti- Federalists, who were concerned that the proposed federal system would amass too much power within the central government at the expense of the states and their people ( Storing 1985: 8-9). However, not until the aftermath of the Great Depression and World War II, when threats to democracy--and its limits-- became frighteningly obvious, did this impulse fully emerge as a constant concern.

Much of the concern that developed during this period focused on the question of how democratic a nation might become without risking its stability and moral health ( Beitzinger 1972: 516)--a question that took on added resonance and seemed to lead to different sorts of answers with the social movements of the 1960s ( Piven and Cloward 1977; Schultz and Schultz 1989; Zinn 1980). Clearly as relevant today as in 1791, debates over how best to effect stability while minimizing risk are as contentious as they have ever been, as is roundly evidenced in discussions of the "canon" and disputations over whom to include

-179-

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Presidential Frontiers: Underexplored Issues in White House Politics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Part I - The First Frontier: The Nature of the Office 1
  • Chapter 1 - The Normative Study of the Presidency 3
  • Notes 17
  • Chapter 2 - The President as Representative 23
  • Notes 34
  • References 35
  • Chapter 3 Washington And/Or Versailles: the White House as a Court Society 37
  • References 51
  • Chapter 4 - Electing Presidents and Other Potentates 53
  • Part II - New Insights on Power and Policy 77
  • Chapter 5 - The Overlooked Relevance of the Pardon Power 79
  • References 96
  • Chapter 6 - The Presidency and Social Policy 99
  • References 114
  • Chapter 7 - The Other Side of War: Presidential Peace Powers 119
  • References 133
  • Chapter 8 - The President and Federal Reserve Nominations 135
  • References 146
  • Part III - New Political and Cultural Frontiers 149
  • Chapter 9 - The Presidency as a Cultural Pulpit 151
  • References 175
  • Chapter 10 - The Other Side of Power: Who Is Left Out of Presidential Rhetoric? 179
  • References 190
  • Chapter 11 - First Partner: First Ladies and Their Roles 195
  • Appendix 221
  • Notes 223
  • References 223
  • Afterword 227
  • References 230
  • Index 231
  • About the Contributors 235
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