Religion in a Changing World: Comparative Studies in Sociology

By Madeleine Cousineau | Go to book overview

CONCLUSION

Data on Jewish "return" or conversion to traditional Judaism suggests that the societal context of return has a major impact on the process of conversion. In both the United States and the former Soviet Union this is a two-step process involving first ethnic identification and later religious identification. In Israel, where Jewish ethnic identity is a taken-for-granted aspect of Israeli identity the return to traditional religion does not require a deeper involvement in ethnic Jewishness prior to religious return.

The pattern for couples in the FSU is somewhat complicated by the fact that women follow the lead of men. For American couples, women seem less dependent on their men and articulate these stages more clearly. Furthermore, American men sometimes follow women into traditional Judaism.

In broader terms, the argument presented here suggests that the majority/minority status of converts and of the religion to which they are converting affects the conversion process. The two types examined in this chapter are only a portion of the possible variations. Judaism is a religion in which ethnicity and religion are intertwined. Would Irish or Italian Catholicism or American Protestantism be similar? How much cultural affinity must exist before there is a sense of ethnic identity?

Moreover, there is also the case of moving from the religion of a majority group to that of a minority group. Would the new religious involvement in Judaism of a secular Jewish Israeli immigrant to America involve a prior renewed or heightened sense of ethnic identity? These questions suggest points that require further study.


NOTES

I am grateful for the support provided for this research by the Research Foundation of the City University of New York, the Memorial Foundation for Jewish Culture, and the Lucius N. Littaur Foundation. An earlier version of this chapter has appeared in Anson Shupe and Bronislaw Misztal (eds.), Religion, Mobilization, and Social Action. Copyright © 1998. The chapter has been included in this volume with permission of GREENWOOD PUBLISHING GROUP, INC., Westport, CT.

1.
Russian pogroms were attacks by Christian mobs against Jews, generally involving destruction of property, looting, murder, and rape, while the civil and military authorities provided no protection and secretly or even openly supported the mobs.
2.
Blood libel is the allegation that Jews murder non-Jewish children to use their blood for Passover and other rituals. These libels, which led to massacres of Jews, first emerged in Europe during the Middle Ages and continued into the twentieth century, most often in Russia and more recently in Nazi Germany.
3.
For a full discussion of these cases and others see Danzger ( 1989).

REFERENCES

Alba Richard. 1990. Ethnic Identity: The Transformation of White America. New Haven: Yale University Press.

-18-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Religion in a Changing World: Comparative Studies in Sociology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 238

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.