Religion in a Changing World: Comparative Studies in Sociology

By Madeleine Cousineau | Go to book overview

SOME CONCLUSIONS

Both men and women see identity as couched in a need to be a part of a unique historical experience, a tie to a people and a past with a particular culture. Religion plays a lesser part in this understanding of Jewish identity than do culture and history. The Holocaust, while certainly a part of Jewish identity, is best seen as a part of political identities whereby social justice is directed toward others as much as other Jews, if not more so. Gender differences are clearest in the ways in which each sex narrates their understanding of identity and the consequences of "unique" and "different" and the way in which women deal with being female in a society that still maintains stereotypical views of them and in an ethnic religious community that is still prototypically male.


NOTE
1.
The Orthodox comprise approximately 10 to 12 percent of the U.S. Jewish population.

REFERENCES

Connolly William E. 1991. Identity/Difference. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.

Feingold Henry. 1991. "The American Component of American Jewish Identity." Pp. 69-81 in David M. Gordis and Yav Ben-Horin (eds.), Jewish Identity in America. Los Angeles: Susan and David Wilstein Institute of Jewish Policy Studies, University of Judaism.

Kaufman Debra Renee. 1991. Rachel's Daughters. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press.

Meyers Michael. 1990. Jewish Identity in the Modern World. Seattle: University of Washington Press.

Seidler-Feller Chaim. 1991. "Responses." Pp. 61-65 in David M. Gordis and Yav Ben-Horin (eds.), Jewish Identity in America. Los Angeles: Susan and David Wilstein Institute of Jewish Policy Studies, University of Judaism.

Silberstein Laurence J. 1994. "Others Within and Others Without: Rethinking Jewish Identity and Culture." Pp. 1-34 in Laurence J. Silberstein and Robert L. Cohn (eds.), The Other in Jewish Thought and History. New York: New York University Press.

-56-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Religion in a Changing World: Comparative Studies in Sociology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 238

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.