Religion in a Changing World: Comparative Studies in Sociology

By Madeleine Cousineau | Go to book overview

Cheryl Townsend Gilkes present historical analyses. The first shows struggles between religion and governments in China, the second competing interpretations of Islam and its relationship to the modern world, and the third the emergence of African American holiness and pentecostal churches as a form of psychological survival in the face of slavery and other forms of institutional racism. Pentecostalism is also the topic of David Smilde's article, based on recent interviews with Protestants in Venezuela about their views of social change. This is followed by my own chapter on social activism among Catholics in Brazil and the chapter by Mark Rozell and Clyde Wilcox showing religion as a conservative force, in the form of the Christian Right in the United States. The final two chapters focus on new religious movements in relation to different aspects of social change. Gary Bouma examines the phenomenon of cultural diffusion in relation to new religions in Australia. Helen Berger describes the views of contemporary American Witches on ecological issues.

As societies become more secular, a greater variety of possibilities in relation to religion is likely to develop. These possibilities may be reflected in terms of both new kinds of religions and new relationships between religion and other social institutions. In the twentieth century we have seen a proliferation of ways in which religion interacts with the larger social context. The chapters in Part III offer reflections on the past and provide ideas for thinking about what may be in store for religion and for the world in the century to come.


REFERENCE

Bellah Robert N. 1967. "Civil Religion in America." Daedalus 96:1-21.

-148-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Religion in a Changing World: Comparative Studies in Sociology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 238

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.