Socialism Revised and Modernized: The Case for Pragmatic Market Socialism

By James A. Yunker | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
Another statement of the argument advanced here is contained in the author's 1986 article in Polity: "Would Democracy Survive Under Market Socialism?" The answer to the question posed in the title is "probably yes."
2.
The force of history in shaping the authoritarian Soviet system has been amply acknowledged by Western historians and political scientists. For example, in The Soviet Paradigm ( 1970, pp. vii-viii), Roy Laird writes as follows: "Yet, at the beginning of the 1970's this student of Soviet affairs is impressed by how fundamentally similar the present system is compared to what it was under Stalin and how deeply its authoritarian roots are buried in long centuries of Tsarist absolutism. Indeed, most political change in Russia from early Tsarist times until now can be seen as a slow, relatively linear evolution toward a special type of political model... primarily dependent upon a highly disciplined and bureaucratic apparatus."
3.
The Watergate affair and the consequent resignation of Richard M. Nixon was one of the most fascinating and significant episodes in the post-World War II history of the United States. In its immediate aftermath, a small library of books on the subject was published, many of them contributed by principals in the drama. Overviews include Theodore H. White ( 1975) and Clark Mollenhoff ( 1976). Of the many memoirs by principals, those of John Dean ( 1976) are probably the most significant. It is probably safe to say that in retrospect, a consensus has emerged that on the whole the Watergate affair provided evidence that the American political system is basically in good health. Particularly significant to the present concern were Nixon's futile efforts to enlist the IRS bureaucracy in the cause of his personal power. According to Nixon ( Memoirs, 1978, pp. 676-677): "The Democrats, while in office, had made little effort to camouflage their pressure on the key government agencies. It seemed that even when they were out of power their supporters--particularly among the bureaucrats in the IRS--continued to do the job for them... I repeatedly urged Haldeman and Ehrlichman--though without apparent success-- to have IRS checks made on McGovern's key staff and contributors."
4.
This, for example, is clearly the judgment of George Thayer ( Who Shakes the Money Tree?, 1973, pp. 282-283): "It is another truth that the ties between the Fat Cats and officeholders work in favor of the status quo... No other tie so impedes the orderly process of change in America than that which binds big contributors and office-holders together."

-257-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Socialism Revised and Modernized: The Case for Pragmatic Market Socialism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Title Page ix
  • Preface xi
  • 1 - A New Perspective on Socialism 1
  • 2 - The Pragmatic Market Socialist Proposal 29
  • Notes 58
  • 3 - Pragmatic Market Socialism: Pro and Con 67
  • Notes 92
  • 4 97
  • Notes 140
  • 6 - Investment, Growth, and Entrepreneurship 175
  • Notes 199
  • 7 - People's Capitalism 205
  • Notes 234
  • 8 - Capitalism and Democracy 241
  • Notes 257
  • 9 - Capitalism and History 259
  • Notes 273
  • 10 - Prospects for Change? 277
  • ANALYTICAL APPENDIX 291
  • References 307
  • SUBJECT INDEX 325
  • NAME INDEX 333
  • About the Author 338
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 340

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.