Problems and Prospects for Nuclear Waste Disposal Policy

By Eric B. Herzik; Alvin H. Mushkatel | Go to book overview

have neglected policy implementation. Reports were not detailed or released on time, and priorities were not set. DOE refused to estimate budget needs itself, and denied Congress access to information. This neglect consequently seems to have forced Congress to accept political responsibility for the environmental restoration program. Inducing Congress to take responsibility for decisions that might draw heavy political fire seemed to be a sound strategy for an agency that felt it could not survive in a competitive political system.

Uncertainty was also reduced through judicial action. Uncertainty over support for the environmental restoration program and the likelihood of the program's success encouraged DOE to neglect implementation. This neglect prompted DOE's critics to sue the agency for noncompliance with the law. However, the ultimate result of a court decision, whether adverse or not, would be to reduce uncertainty surrounding the clean-up program's goals, basis of support, and implementation. DOE's precipitate action at the WIPP site in 1991 can be readily explained in this light.

The subsystem model used to study the politics of defense nuclear waste accurately described changes in oversight in this policy area. Conflict and coalitional behavior were often the primary motivation for increases in the frequency of oversight. As the political costs of trying to "keep the problem quiet" rose, the benefits that holding hearings delivered increased and more hearings were held, and oversight hearings became more substantive.

Although the subsystem model was useful in understanding the politics that govern defense nuclear waste, it is not clear that controversy and conflict in the subsystem has ended. Congress may attempt to limit DOE's discretion in administering the program if the agency does not address congressional concerns or if the budget for environmental restoration must tighten in response to other budgetary priorities. Various interest groups not necessarily part of the subsystem may also use the judicial system to gain access to decisionmaking processes. However, it appears as if DOE will continue to build supportive coalitions for itself within Congress, and competition for the resources necessary to control policymaking concerning the defense nuclear weapons complex will continue.


NOTES
1.
The DOE weapons complex is divided into four major activities, as follows: (1) research and development at Los Alamos and Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California; (2) nuclear materials production and processing (plutonium and tritium) at the Hanford Plant in Washington

-135-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Problems and Prospects for Nuclear Waste Disposal Policy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 166

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.