Problems and Prospects for Nuclear Waste Disposal Policy

By Eric B. Herzik; Alvin H. Mushkatel | Go to book overview

10
Environmental Policymaking Under New Federalism: The Hanford Clean-Up

MARCY JEAN EVEREST

Environmental problems in the United States have been troubling policymakers for two decades. One of the biggest problems is the handling of stored nuclear waste, which has been piling up at commercial reactors and federal weapons facilities for forty-five years. Complicating matters even more is the often extensive site contamination that has occurred with the mismanagement of stored and disposed nuclear waste. The complexities and dangers posed by the handling of such waste have presented a unique challenge to policymakers, who have had to develop and implement waste management and clean-up policies in the midst of constantly changing technology.

These technical challenges were added to the problem of federal agency proliferation in the 1970s, when multiple agencies shared jurisdiction over policy areas. The policy fragmentation which resulted promoted redundant actions of agencies, and policy lacked coordination and direction. The result was environmental policy that has been largely ineffective and unsatisfactory.

The adoption of "New Federalism" in the 1980s has changed that policymaking process. By devolving authority from the federal system to the states, the role of the federal agencies that once dominated the policymaking agenda has been reduced ( Davis and Lester, 1989). Individual states must now take the lead in environmental policy development and implementation and are facing the challenge of how to do it more successfully than the federally dominated system of the past. These rapidly changing circumstances provide a new challenge to our understanding of policy formation and implementation and demand further refinement of existing theories.

-139-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Problems and Prospects for Nuclear Waste Disposal Policy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 166

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.