The Case Method at the Harvard Business School: Papers by Present and Past Members of the Faculty and Staff

By Malcolm P. McNair | Go to book overview

In the preceding paper Professor Borden has described one approach to the organization of a case course by narrating the development, over more than twenty-five years, of his course in Advertising Problems in the Harvard Business School. The resulting course outline, as reproduced at the end of Professor Borden's paper, is one which might be termed broadly as functional in character. Such a functional course structure, however, is by no means the only possible one. Quite a different concept for the organization of a case course is set forth in the following paper by John G. McLean,* in which he explains the development, during the postwar period, of a course in Advanced Production Problems. The concept around which Professor McLean's course is built is that of the industry rather than the function.


The Industry Approach to the Teaching of Business
Administration by the Case Method JOHN G. McLEAN

Many of the case problems dealing with the programs and policies of industrial companies require for their solution (1) a general understanding of the technological characteristics of the manufacturing process with which the company is working and (2) a thorough comprehension of the competitive situation, economic conditions, and trade practices prevailing in the industry in which the company operates. Typical of the problems which may require either or both of these two kinds of background understanding are problems having to do with such matters as the following: a company's over-all competitive strategy and the interrelationships among its manufacturing, marketing, financial, and research programs; the timing and extent of major plant expansion programs; the advisability of various types of vertical or horizontal integration moves and the balance to be maintained among manufacturing operations at successive levels in vertically integrated structures; the optimum composition of a company's product line from a manufacturing and marketing standpoint; the location of plant facilities and the desirability of centralized versus decentralized manufacturing operations; the wisdom of various types of industrial mergers; and the appropriate management responses to new technological developments or fundamental changes in the economic and competitive environment in which a company operates. In

____________________
*
Parts of the material in this paper have been adapted from The Development of Teaching Methods and Materials for a Course in Manufacturing Policy, a thesis submitted by the author in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Commercial Science at the Harvard Business School in May, 1948.

-178-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Case Method at the Harvard Business School: Papers by Present and Past Members of the Faculty and Staff
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 296

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.