Race, Ethnicity, and Minority Housing in the United States

By Jamshid A. Momeni | Go to book overview

Table 8.12
Percent Distribution of Hispanic and White Gross Rent as a Percent of 1979 Household Income for Renter-Occupied Units by Location
Hispanic Non-Hispanic White
Percent Income Cnt Cty NonCC NonMet Cent Cty NonCC NonMet
Less than 15 % 18.3 17.8 16.6 18.6 18.2 16.2
15 to 19 % 15.3 16.1 11.2 16.4 17.7 12.6
20 to 24 % 13.2 14.4 9.7 15.0 15.9 11.2
25 to 29 % 10.0 10.9 7.2 11.2 11.7 8.3
30 to 34 % 7.2 7.9 5.1 7.8 8.0 5.6
35 to 49 % 12.7 13.4 8.7 13.2 12.7 9.6
50 % or more 23.3 19.4 13.5 17.8 15.9 12.5
Median 26.3 25.6 35.3 25.0 23.6 31.2
Source: Computed based on data from U.S. Bureau of the Census
( 1983a).

Notes
1.
The term "Hispanic" refers to all those who identified themselves as belonging to one of the Spanish origin categories listed in the 1980 census questionnaire number 7 ( U.S. Bureau of the Census, 1975: 2).
2.
Non-Hispanic white population is calculated by subtracting Hispanics, blacks, Asians, Pacific Islanders, American Indians, Aleuts and Eskimos from the total population ( U.S. Bureau of the Census, 1979).
3.
For households with incomes between $15,000 and 19,999 Hispanics were 1.4 to 2.6 times (depending on location), and non-Hispanic whites 1.3 to 1.7 times as likely to own their homes as their fellow ethnics with earnings less than $5,000.
4.
In addition to the definitional problems in intercensal Hispanic comparisons, the use of different data sources also presents inconsistencies based on sampling variability ( U.S. Bureau of the Census, 1982, 1973a, 1983a, 1984a).
5.
Using a source allowing calculations of a non-Hispanic white category ( U.S. Bureau of the Census, 1973a), the increase is from 61.8 to 68.5 percent overall, 46.7 to 54.4 percent for central cities, and 69.1 to 72.4 percent for suburban fringe.
6.
In this case only the total "white" population is available for comparison. Therefore, all data presented should be viewed as conservative estimates of differentials for some Hispanic data are incorporated in the white category.
7.
The weakness of the Annual Housing Survey is the absence of racial categories, allowing the calculation of a non-Hispanic white category. Consequently, the total (all races) population is used in these comparisons.

-143-

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Race, Ethnicity, and Minority Housing in the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Ethnic Studies Series Editor: Leonard W. Doob ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figure and Tables ix
  • Foreword xv
  • Series Foreword xvii
  • Acknowledgments xix
  • Introduction xxi
  • References xxiv
  • 1: A Historical Review of Changes in Public Housing Policies and Their Impacts on Minorities 1
  • Introduction 1
  • Conclusion 14
  • References 15
  • 2: Racial Inequalities in Housing: An Examination of Recent Trends 19
  • Introduction 19
  • Notes 36
  • Acknowledgments 36
  • References 37
  • 3: Racial Inequalities in Home Ownership 39
  • Notes 50
  • References 51
  • 4: Blacks and the American Dream of Housing 53
  • References 65
  • 5: Housing Policy and Suburbanization: An Analysis of the Changing Quality and Quantity of Black Housing in Suburbia since 1950 69
  • Introduction 69
  • Conclusion 83
  • References 85
  • 6: The Housing Conditions of Black Female-headed Households: A Comparative Analysis 89
  • Acknowledgments 107
  • References 108
  • 7: Accessibility to Housing: Differential Residential Segregation for Blacks, Hispanics, American Indians, and Asians 109
  • Introduction 109
  • References 125
  • 8: Su casa no es mi casa: Hispanic Housing Conditions in Contemporary America, 1949- 1980 127
  • Notes 143
  • References 144
  • 9: American Indian Housing: An Overview of Conditions and Public Policy 147
  • Acknowledgments 174
  • References 174
  • 10: Housing Problems of Asian Americans 177
  • References 193
  • 11: Minority Housing Needs and Civil Rights Enforcement 195
  • Introduction 195
  • Conclusions 209
  • Notes 211
  • Acknowledgments 212
  • Selected Bibliography 217
  • Index 221
  • About the Contributors 223
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